Feast and Famine: Food and Nutrition in Ireland 1500-1920

封面
OUP Oxford, 2001年11月15日 - 336 頁
This book traces the history of food and famine in Ireland from the sixteenth to the early twentieth century. It looks at what people ate and drank, and how this changed over time. The authors explore the economic and social forces which lay behind these changes as well as the more personal motives of taste, preference, and acceptability. They analyze the reasons why the potato became a major component of the diet for so many people during the eighteenth century as well as the diets of the middling and upper classes. This is not, however, simply a social history of food but it is a nutritional one as well, and the authors go on to explore the connection between eating, health, and disease. They look at the relationship between the supply of food and the growth of the population and then finally, and unavoidably in any history of the Irish and food, the issue of famine, examining first its likelihood and then its dreadful reality when it actually occurred.

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內容

FOOD ECONOMY AND SOCIETY
1
THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES A PATTERN ESTABLISHED
9
FROM THE RESTORATION TO THE GREAT FAMINE THE FOOD OF THE MIDDLING AND UPPER CLASSES
29
POTATOES POPULATION AND DIET CIRCA 1650 TO CIRCA 1845
59
DIETARY CHANGES 18451920
88
FOOD FAMINE AND IRELAND
111
THE ANATOMY OF FAMINE
134
FOOD AND NUTRITION
164
NUTRITION HEALTH AND DEMOGRAPHY
222
FOOD MUNICIPALITIES AND THE STATE
249
CONCLUSION
279
Account Books
282
Bibliography
287
Index
321
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第 137 頁 - And no spectacle was more frequent in the ditches of towns, and especially in wasted countries, than to see multitudes of these poor people dead with their mouths all coloured green by eating nettles, docks, and all things they could rend up above ground.
第 136 頁 - Art aforesaid, in their return homeward, saw a most horrible spectacle of three children (whereof the eldest was not above ten yeeres old), all eating and knawing with their teeth the entrals of their dead mother...
第 53 頁 - Drinking is a most beastly vice in every country, but it is really a ruinous one to Ireland. Nine gentlemen in ten are impoverished by the great quantity of claret which, from mistaken notions of hospitality and dignity, they think it necessary should be drunk in their houses.
第 137 頁 - It is a melancholy object to those who walk through this great town or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads, and cabin doors, crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags and importuning every passenger for an alms.
第 138 頁 - ... nettles which they fed on ; two or three, sometimes more, on a car going to the grave for want of bearers to carry them, and many buried only in the fields and ditches where they perished.
第 12 頁 - They devour great morsels of beef unsalted, and they eat commonly swine's flesh, seldom mutton, and all these pieces of flesh, as also the entrails of beasts unwashed, they seethe in a hollow tree, lapped in a raw cow's hide, and so set over the fire, and therewith swallow whole lumps of filthy butter.
第 295 頁 - Memoranda, Statistical Tables, and Charts prepared in the Board of Trade with Reference to Various Matters bearing on British and Foreign Trade and Industrial Conditions, 19o3, LXVII (the Fiscal Blue Book of 19o3), p.
第 228 頁 - I have heard it stigmatized as being unhealthy, and not sufficiently nourishing for the support of hard labour ; but this opinion is very amazing in a country, many of whose poor people are as athletic in their form, as robust, and as capable of enduring labour as any upon earth.
第 12 頁 - Many of the EnglishIrish have by little and little been infected with the Irish filthiness, and that in the very cities, excepting Dublin, and some of the better sort in Waterford, where the English, continually lodging in their houses, they more retain the English diet. The English-Irish after our manner serve to the table joints of flesh cut after our fashion, with geese, pullets, pigs, and like roasted meats, but their ordinary food for the common sort is of white meats, and they eat cakes of...
第 12 頁 - And for this cause they watchfully keep their cows, and fight for them as for their religion and life ; and when they are almost starved, yet they will not kill a cow, except it be old and yield no milk. Yet will they upon hunger in time of war open a vein of the cow and drink the blood, but in no case kill or much weaken it. A man would think these men to be Scythians...

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