Story of the Volsungs & Niblungs

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F.S. Ellis, 1870 - 275 頁
 

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第 105 頁 - What didst thou with that ring that I gave thee, even the one which King Budli gave me at our last parting, when thou and King Giuki came to him and threatened fire and the sword, unless ye had me to wife? Yea, at that time he led me apart, and asked me which I had chosen of those who were come ; but I prayed him that I might abide to ward the land and be chief over the third part of his men; then were there two choices for me to deal betwixt, either that I should be wedded to him whom he would,...
第 200 頁 - Her shall bite The rede of Bikki, Whereas for no good Wins Jormunrek life; And so is clean perished All the kin of Sigurd, Yea, and more greeting, And more for Gudrun. "And now one prayer Yet pray I of thee — The last word of mine Here in the world — So broad on the field Be the burg of the dead That fair space may be left For us all to lie down, All those...
第 x 頁 - Sigurd's slaying ; it is very incomplete, though the Sagaman has drawn some incidents from it ; the reader will find it translated in our second part. But before the death of the heroine we have inserted entire into the text as chap. xxxi. the First Lay of Gudrun, the most lyrical, the most complete, and the most beautiful of all the Eddaic poems ; a poem that any age or language might count among its most precious possessions. From this point to the end of the Saga it keeps closely to the Songs...
第 172 頁 - No vain things' beguiling Is that thou beholdest, Nor the ruin of all things ; Though thou lookest upon us, Though we smite with spurs Our horses' sides ; Rather dead warriors May wend their ways homeward. Then went the bondmaid home, and told Sigrun, and sang — Go out, Sigrun From Sevafell, If thou listest to look on The lord of thy people ! For the mound is uncovered Thither is Helgi come, And his wounds are bleeding, But the king thee biddeth To come and stay That stream of sorrow. So Sigrun...
第 74 頁 - Help-runes shalt thou gather If skill thou wouldst gain To loosen child from low-laid mother; Cut be they in hands hollow, Wrapped the joints round about; Call for the Good-folks' gainsome helping Learn the bough-runes wisdom If leech-lore thou lovest; And wilt wot about wounds' searching On the bark be they scored; On the buds of trees Whose boughs look eastward ever. Thought-runes shalt thou deal with If thou wilt be of all men Fairest-souled wight, and wisest, These areded These first cut These...
第 3 頁 - Sigi and all his folk with him. But Rerir, his son, was not in this trouble, and he brought together so mighty a strength of his friends and the great men of the land, that he got to himself both the lands and kingdom of Sigi his father; and so now, when he deems that the feet under him stand firm in his rule, then he calls to mind that which he had against his mother's brothers, who had slain his father. So the king gathers together a mighty army, and therewith falls on his kinsmen, deeming that...
第 97 頁 - speak not to me of such things ; unless thou be the first and best of all men ; for then shalt thou slay those my wooers, if thou hast heart thereto ; I have been in battles with the king of the Greeks, and our weapons were stained with red blood, and for such things still I yearn." He answered, "Yea, certes many great deeds hast thou done ; but yet call thou to mind thine oath, concerning the riding through of this fire, wherein thou didst swear that thou wouldst go with the man who should do this...
第 213 頁 - Mid the host of thy foemen. So now all ye, O House of the Niblungs, Shall be brought to naught, O ye oath-breakers ! Think'st thou not, Gunnar, How that betid, When ye let the blood run Both in one footstep ? With ill reward Hast thou rewarded His heart so fain To be the foremost ! As well was seen When he rode his ways, That king of all worth, Unto my wooing ; How the host-destroyer Held to the vows Sworn beforetime, Sworn to the young king. For his wounding-wand All wrought with gold, The king...
第 62 頁 - How namest thou the holm whereon Surt and the ^Esir mix and mingle the water of the sword ? " " Unshapen is that holm hight," said Fafnir. And yet again he said, " Regin, my brother, has brought about my end, and it gladdens my heart that thine too he bringeth about ; for thus will things be according to his will.
第 104 頁 - Let us lay aside vain babble," says Brynhild. " Long did I hold my peace concerning my sorrow of heart, and, lo now, thy brother alone do I love ; let us fall to other talk.

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