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4. 106.

3. 188.

3. 87.

Truely, adv. In accordance with

vamp or upper leather, as a shoe

or boot. Arch. and dial. 5. 323. 4. 361.

Varlet, n. A low fellow; a scounTrusty, a. 1. Strong ; firm. 1. 211. drel: a term of contempt or re2. Faithful.

1. 291, 332 ; 2. 112, proach. 3. 103. 127 ; 3. 424.

Venter, v. Obs. form of venture. Try, v. To put to the test or proof. I. 216, et passim. 3. 79.

Venture, n. *Adventure. 2. 316. Tune, n. 1. Mood, frame of mind.

Venus, n. Sexual intercourse; 4. 360.

venery. 4. 435. Tweluemoneth, n. A year. Arch. Vertue, n. 1. Potency; efficacy. Ind. 58.

I. 47. 'Twixt, prep. Abbrev. of betwixt 2. Phr., by the virtue of: by or = between. Arch.

through the authority of.

Vicious, a. Virulent; malignant ; Uncivill, a. Fof apparel : lacking spiteful. Colloq. Ind. 134. in taste ; gaudy; immodest. Prol.

Villainy, n. I. Atrocious evil o +Vncurteous, a. Discourteous, wickedness. uncivil. 2. 121, 332.

2. A villainous act; a crime. 3. Vnderstanding, ppl. a. Informed ; 264, 286. intelligent. Ind. 27.

Visited, ppl. a. Afflicted; said esVado, v. To bring ruin or distress pecially of diseases.

1. 279. upon. 4. 193 ; 5. 44. Vnfurnished, ppl.a. +Unprovid-Wag, n. +A practical joker; one ed. I. 290.

who indulges in buffoonery or misVnhappy, a. 11. Full of tricks ;

chief.

2. 19; 5. 288. mischievous ; tricksy.

2. 288.

Wait, n. tone of a body of mu2. Associated with ill fortune. 3. sicians, who played about the 486.

streets at night, especially in the Vnkind, a. Lacking in affection. seventeenth century, in England.

Rare, exc. dial. Vnknowing, ppl. a. Ignorant. +Wanion, n. A word found only 3. 355.

in the phrases with a wanion, Vnpeopled, ppl. a. Without inhab and wanions on you ; generally itants. 3. 6.

interpreted to denote some kind Vnthrift,n. +A spendthrift ; a of imprecation. Phr., with prodigal. 4. 155.

ion : with a vengeance; energetVnthrifty, a. Wasteful; prodigal. ically; hence in short order. 2. 169.

174. Vrge, v. To press upon the at. Want, v. To fail in. 5. 185. tention. 2. 448.

Ward, n.

+A regiment or other Vsage, n. Treatment. 3. 431, 478. division of an army. 5. 91. Vsher, n. Escort, conductor. 4. Warren, n. A piece of ground 247.

appropriated to the breeding and

preservation of rabbits and other Vale, interj. Farewell; adieu. game.

I. 134. tForm for the ending of a letter +Wast(e)-thrift, n.

+Wast(e)-thrift, n. A spendthrift. or other written address. Prol.

1. 350. Valiant. a. 1. Courageous ; intrep

Watch, n. +1. The annual vigil id in danger. 1. 153.

of St. John's. 1. 155. Cf. note. +2. Strong ; powerful. 5. 168. +2. A watchman, or body of watchVamp, v. To furnisb with a new men, stationed in old London, to

4. 288.

Ind. 119.

2.

1

1

3. 84.

ly.

guard public property and the iarity. 1. 116; 2. 574 ; 3. 323 : peace. 3. 100.

whoresome, I. 322 ; whoor sonne 3. A vigil. 3. 23.

I. 371.
Watching, vbl. n. Keeping vigil. | Wich, pron. Form of which. 5. 23.

Wight, 1. Mortal ; a human being.
Wee, prep. Obs. form of wi' = Obs. or arch.

3. 355, 476. with. Cf. variants. 2. 538. Willing, a. +Harmonious; likeWelfauourdlie, adv. In a grati

minded.

4. 478. fying or pleasing way; 'handsome.

Wise, n. Manner; mode; guise. 2. 285.

Obs. or arch. exc. in phrases like Well, a. Well off.

4. 436.

in any wise, &c. 3. 411 ; 5. 324. Well spoken, a. Given to using Withall, adv. Besides; likewise.

decorous speech. Dial. I. 267. Ded. ; 1. 77, 118; 4. 238. Wench, n. A young woman. Arch. † Withall, prep. An emphatic form

or lit. The word as current now of with, used after the object (usuhas a deprecatory sense.

I. 303,

ally a relative) at the end of a et passim.

sentence or clause.

4. 12. Were, v. Obs. form of wear. 3.

Woeman, n. Obs. form of woman. 19.

2. 486, et passim. When al's done, phr. After all. +Won, v. To dwell.

3. 256. Dial. 5. 249.

Wood, v. Obs. form of preterite Whether, adv. An obs. form of of will. 2. 586. whither. 1. 315; 3. 390.

Wrastle, v. Obs. or dial, form of Whether, pron. Arch. Which. wrestle.

3. 296. 1. 138.

Wrought, ppl. a. Embroidered.
Whilome, adv. Arch. Once. 1.137. Arch. ? 2. 422.
Whipt. ppl. a. Overlaid ; wound

round and round, as with thread. Ycleped, pp. Form of past par-
1. 163.

ticiple of the obs. or arch, verb Whistle, n. Phr., to wet (one's) clepe: to call by the name of.

whistle : to take a drink of liquor 3. 257.
with reference to wetting the Yea, adı. Yea, being mainly a
throat and vocal organs in order word of assent, was formerly used
to improve the tone of the voice. chiefly in

to questions Colloq. and jocose. 5. 192.

framed affirmatively. Ind. 16. White boy, n. “An old term of Yeeld, v. Obs. form of yield. endearment applied to a favorite

*To repay.

I. 119; 4. 164. son, or the like; a darling. Yer, pron. Dial. form of your.

85. +Whoreson, a. Bastard-like; low: Yong, a. Obs.

young used in contempt or coarse famil 1. 217, et passim.

answer

2.

2. 539.

INDEX

A

Blanket-tossing, 135.
Adam Bell, lxix, lxxiv, lxxvi. Bold Beauchamps, lxxxi, lxxxii, 120.
Amadis of Gaul, relations to the

Boot-hose, 228.
burlesque in K. of B. P., xxxvii,

Boots, affectation of wearing polished,
xlixff., lvi, lxviii, lxix, lxxii, lxxiii ; 229.
origin of, 162 ; cited, 145, 163,

Boy, as attendant at theatre, 121;
166, 171, 172, 191, 204, 206.

as a regular actor, 121; as
Apparel, actors', 122 ; soldiers', 251.

dancer between the acts, 155.
Apron, blue, of tradesmen, 146. Boy-actors, kidnapping of, 166.
Archery, practice of, 267.

Brionella, 163.
Arches, court of, 220.

Brome, Richard, his mention of Kr.
Arthur's show, cx, 225, 253.

of B. P. in Sparagus Garden,
Artillery Gardens, practice of arms

xvii ; his ridicule of the fashion
revived in, xiii, cxii, 225.

of romance-reading, lxxiii, lxxix,

bis satirical treatment of the man-
As ye came from the Holy Land,
a ballad, 181.

ners of theatrical spectators, in
Authorship of the play, xxi ff.

The Antipodes, cvii.
Bullets, a term for barber's soap-

balls, 197.

Bumbo Fair, 230.
B

Burre, Walter, xiv, xxiv, 106, 107.
Baloo, a ballad, 184.

Butter, as an unguent, 228 ; as a
Barbaroso, 195.

medicinal remedy, 242.
Barber's basin, xlv, 195, 196.
Barber's pole, 195, 204.

с
Barber shop, description of the old-
time, 214.

Candles, blue, at funerals, 233.
Bear, pestilential effect of the breath Captain, City, 266.
of the, 273

Captain, duties of a, 256, 259, 261.
Beaten gold, 224.

Carduus Benedictus as a medicinal
Beaumont and Fletcher, their indebt. remedy, cx, 202.

edness to Spanish literature, xxxiii; Casket, adventures of the, xxxix,
their literary qualities, xxii ff.; for 171.
citations, cf. individual works, Catch, nature of a, 180.
Coxcomb, &c.

Caves as habitations of giants, xlix ff.,
Beer at the theatre, 218.

195.
Beeston's Boys, xviii.

Chamberlain at an inn, 175.
Begone, begone, my juggy, my puggy, Chapman, George, his satire on the

fashion of romance-reading in East-
Bell Inn, xl ff., 174.

ward Ho, xciii.
Bells in the Morris-dance, 244. Children of the Queen's Revels, xiv,
Bevis of Hampton, lxix, lxx, lxxvi, 110, 122.
1xxx, 188.

Chivalric plays, lists of, lxxviii, lxxxi ;
Blackfriars Theatre, xiv, 122.

quality and popularity of, lxxviii ff.;

a song, 216.

114, 166.

protests of Puritans and social of Kn. of B. P., XV; the attri-
satirists against, lxxxvii ff. ; attacks bution of, as a source of Kn, of

of the dramatists upon, lxxxix ff. B. P., xxxiiff. ; cited, 105, 107,
Citizens, their interruptions of plays, 144, 148, 149, 150, 151, 162,

cviff., 110; libelous stage repre 171, 189, 190, 191, 194, 195,
sentations of, civ, 112.

203, 204, 207.
City walls, 109.

Douglas Tragedy, a ballad, 182,
Civic drama, nature and representative Dragon-water, 147.
specimens of, xcv ff.

Drake, the life and death of fat, 117.
Cloak-bag, 234.

Drummer, 253.
Cockpit Theatre, xvi, 271.

Drums, 246, 249.
Colors of the infantry, 254 ; regu Dryden, John, his comment on the

lations concerning the use of, 255. popularity of Beaumont and Flet-
Commons of the City, 117.

cher, xix.
Companies of London, the Twelve, Dulcinea del Toboso, the attributed

prototype of Susan. liv ff., 203.
Company, consistency of a military, Dutchman, the great, 198.
253.

Dwarf as an attendant upon knights,
Compliment, language of, 231.

xxxvii, 148; as bearer of the
Conduit, 236.

knights' armor, 192.
Conjurers, 233.
Corselet, 257.
Coxcomb, cited, 161, 178.

E
Cracovia, King of, 233.

Elenor, Queen, the story of, xcix, 116.
Crane, sign of the, 106.

Entertainment at inns, 177.
Crier, town, 173.
Cupid's Revenge, cited, 201.
Curtain, lack of, on old stage, 184f.

F
Curtain Theatre, xi.
Cypress branches at funerals, 232. Fading, 219.

Fair Margaret and Sweet William,

a ballad, 178.
D

Faithful Friends, its satire on the
Dagonet, Sir, 224, 253.

fashion of romance-reading, xciv.
Dam, the devil's, 169.

Faithful Shepherdess, its unpopu.
Day, Rowley, and Wilkins, Travailes larity, cix.

of the Three English Brothers, Falconer, 234.
its bearing on the date of Kn. of | Favor, lady's, 228.
B. P., xi; its relationship to Feathers, 237, 257.
the burlesque in Kn. of B. P., Fencing-school, cx, 172.
xcix f.
22)

Fingers, barber's knacking' of, 197.
Deed indent, 227.

Fire-eaters, 220.
Defiance, mode of, in romances of Flags, 249.
chivalry, 171.

Footman, 176.
Dekker, Thos., his attacks on the Forked heads, 268.
romances, xciv.

Fortune, my Foe, a song, 264.
Devil's mark on witches, 211. Four Plays in One, xxiii; cited, 152.
Diet as a medicinal remedy, 136, Four Prentices of London. Cf. Hey.
168, 211, 213.

wood.
Dog, possession of, a mark of a Franarco, Palmerin de Oliva's con-
gentleman, 216.

flict with, 140 ff.
Don Quixote, its bearing on the date Freeman, qualifications of a, 114.

U

G

Hobby-horse, 241.
Gallants seated on the stage, ciii,

Hogsdon, 245.

Honest Man's Fortune, cited, 271.
108 ; their aversion to the combing

Honour of a London Apprentice, a
of the hair, 196 ; their fashion of

ballad, a possible object of the
trimming the beard and dressing

burslesque, lxi, 118.
the hair, 208 ; their aversion to

Horace, 105, 274.
shorn locks, 209; their scorn of
the tradesmen, 213, 270.

Host, proverbial merriment of mine,

190.
Galley-foist, captain of the, 262.

Hostess, kissing of, on leaving an ina,
Gargantua, 205.

235.
Garters, 245.

Hotspur, lines from speech of, 123.
Gaskins, 161.

Humorous Lieutenant, cited, 228, 243.
Giants, conventional employment of,
in romances of chivalry, xlix, 161;

I
Palmerin de Oliva's conflict with,
140 ff., 198; Rosicler's conflict I am three merry men, a catch, 178.
with, 197 ; boastful manner of,
204.

J
Gloves given as presents at betrothals Jane Shore, xcv, xcviii, 120.
and weddings, 134 ; decorations

Jerkin, 251.
of, 134 ; costs of, 135.

Jeronimo, 125.
Go from my window, a catch, 215. Jillian of Berry, 235.
God of sleep, 187.

John Dory, a ballad, 168.
Gresham, Life and Death of Sir

Jonson, Ben, Alchemist, as an evi-
Thomas, xcv, xcvii, 115.

dence of the date of Kin. of B. P.;
Grocers, civic importance of, 114f.; his satirical treatment of the Ro.
guild livery of, 127; shop dress

mances of chivalry and the ro-
of, 139; hall of, 269.

mantic drama, xci ff. ; his satir.
Gun-flint, 258.

ical treatment of Jacobean audi-
Guns, 246, 249.
Guy of Warwick, lxix, lxxii, lxxiii,
1xxvi, lxxxi.

K

Keysar, Robert, xiv, xv, 106.
H

King and No King, its burlesque
Heads, velvet, 244.

elements, xii, xxx ; cited, 152, 206.
Helmet, 172.

knight and Shepherd's Daughter,
Her Majesty's Servants, xvii, xviii, a ballad, 182.
271.

Knights-errant, names of, 149; order
Hermaphrodite, xiii, 200.

of, 151; vows and oaths of, 162;
Heywood, Thos., The Four Prentices duties of, 165; numerous frater.

of London, as an evidence of the nities and religious character of,
date of Kn. of B. P., xiii; as an 175 ; fastings of, 194;

hard
object of the burlesque, lix ff., 117, couches of, 194.
149 ; as a type of the chivalric Knight of the Burning Pestle, edi-

drama, lxxxii; analysis of its plot, tions, iiff. ; date and stage-history,
cui lxxxii ff. ; as typical of the taste of xiff. ; authorship, xxi ff., 106,

tradesmen xcvi; cited, 117, 149, 107, 270, 272, 274 ; originality of
222163, 225; If you know not me, the conception, xxv ; relationships

xcv, xcvii, 115; Edward IV, xcv, with the Romances of Chivalry and
xcviii, 120.

Don Quixote, xxxii ff. ; relation.
Ho, ho, no body at home, a catch, 235. ships with contemporary plays and

ences, cviii.

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