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of.

2.

Heate, n. New life, animation, sake of honoring; in celebration courage, spirit. Fig. 1.4. Cf.note.

Obs. 4. 416. +Hedge binding, n. Something Hony, n. Obs. form of honey. used to bind together the bushes

I. 166. composing a hedge. 2. 454.

Horse, v. To carry on a man's Helme, n. Helmet. Poet, or arch. back or shoulders. 3. 128. 2. 112, 119.

Hote, a.

Obs. form of hot. 4. 237. Here, v. Obs. form of hear, House, n.

† Phr., to fling the house 179, et passim.

out at the window : to put everyHether, adv. Obs. form of hither. thing into confusion. 3. 528. 2. 261.

How do you, phr. Obs. or dial. Hight, pp. Called, named. Arch. How fare you; how are you. 2. 408, et passim.

103 ; how dost thou, 2. 364. Him, pron. flt. Ded.

Hower, n. Obs. form of hour. His, pron. flts. Ded.

4. 338. History, n. †A relation of inci Huffing, ppl.a. Blustering, ranting

dents (in early use, either true or swaggering. Ind. 82. imaginary ; later, only of those Hurle, v. †To‘throw 'in wrestling. professedly true); a narrative, tale, 3. 297.

story. 3. Title ; 1. 281; 4. 64. Hobby-horse, n. tin the Morris I, Ťinterj. Aye; yes. Ind. 50, 94,

dance, a dancer, about whose waist 125 ; 1. 264, 309, 413, 429, 433 ; was fastened the figure of a horse 2. 96, 140, 288, 573 ; 3. 207, 231, made of wicker work or other 503, 518; 4. 151 ; 5. 8.

light material. 4. 456. Cf. note. I, prep. 'I,' i, weakened from In +Hoit, v. To indulge in riotous before a consonant, as in i' faith.

and noisy mirth. 1. 386 ; hoight, Now dial, or arch. Ind. 141, et 4. 194.

passim. Hold, v. 1. Phr., hold (one's) | I faith, phr. Ind. 141. Cf. faith.

peace : to cease or refrain from Ill, adv. Wrongfully ; malevolently. speaking. Arch. Ind. 6, 43. 2. Phr., hold vp (one's) head : to mu, n. Wrong-doing. Arch. 3. 506. maintain one's dignity, pride, Ill-fauouredly, adv. Unpleasingly; courage. Ind. 80; 2, 108.

in an ill-favoured manner. 3. refl. To persist in an opinion. Imbrace, v. or n. Obs. form of Cf. note.

embrace. 2. 120, 546. †4. To wager, bet. 2. 295 ; 3. Imployment, n. Obs. form of 295.

employment. 4. 20. 5. Phr., hold vp: to resist. Dial. In, prep. ŤAt. 2. 115. 3. 371.

Inchanted, ppl. a. Obs. form of 6. (For refl.). In imperative as enchanted. 2. 116, et passim, an exclamation Stop! Arch.

Inchantment, n.

Obs. form of 5. 45.

enchantment, 2. 359. Holesome, a. Obs. form of whole. tIndeed-law, interj. phr. Chiefly

asseverative. 2. 99, et passim. Honest, a. Well-intentioned, well. Indent, ppl. a. (Reduced form in. disposed. Ind. 136.

dented) †Formerly applied to the Honour, n. 1. Phr., in or for the severing of the two halves of a

honour of : for the sake of honor document, drawn up in duplicate, ing; in celebration of.

by a toothed, zigzag or wavy line, 4. 427 ; 5. 77.

so that the two parts exactly tal. 2. Phr., to the honour of : for the lied with each other. 4. 92.

3. 66.

4. 62.

1. 413.

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some.

4. 98.

Ind. 29;

2.

Infidel, n. One who is unfaithful Kickshoes, n. Obs. form of kickto his duty. I. 66.

shaws. A fancy dish in cookery. Inforce, v. Obs. form of enforce. (Chiefly with contemptuous force :

Tocompel, constrain, oblige. Const. a 'something 'French, not one of to with inf. Arch. 4. 84.

the known 'substantial English' +Ingrant, a. A perverted form of dishes). To the Readers.

ignorant. N. E. D.? A corrup- +Kill one's heart, phr. To detion of ingrate. Ungrateful. Arch.? press or discourage one completely. 3. 576. Cf. note.

4. 146. Inough, adv. Obs. form of enough. Kind, a. 1. Affectionate, loving, 3. 503.

fond. Rare exc. dial. 1. 145 ; I'now, a. Obs. form of enow.

3. 44, 61; 4. 287. 556. Cf. Enow.

†2. Well-breed, of good birth, Intent, n. Aim; purpose ; object gentle. 1. 217, 219; 3. 278.

of an action. Rare or obs. 1. 313. Kinde, n. The manner, way or Intreat, v. Obs. or arch. form of fashion, which is proper or befit.

entreat. †To prevail upon by ting to the character. Freq. in

entreaty or solicitation. 4. 153. phr., in (their, his) kind. ComInvective, a. Characterized by mon in 17 th c. ; now arch. Ind.

denunciatory or railing language ; 98; 3. 629. vituperative, abusive. Now rare. 12. Race ; stock ; breed. I. 209. To the Readers.

Kindly, adv. 1. Phr., to take Inueigle, v. To gain over and kindly : to accept good-naturedly,

take captive by deceptive allure or as a kindness. I. 168. ment. 2. 220.

+2. Thoroughly. 5. 373. Issue, n. Progeny. Fig. 5. 161. Knack, n. A trinket, knick-knack. It, pron. †1. Used for he.

I. 330,

Obs.? 2. 91 ; 4. 422. 410; 2. 12, 108, 383, 514; 3. | Knaue, n. Jocularly, or without 335, 337.

seriously implying bad qualities. †2. Used for she. 3. 150.

Now rare.

5. 289. I'th', prep. A contraction of ithe Knauery, n. Trickery, fraud. 1.68.

= in the. Dial, or arch. 1. 186, +Knight Aduenturer, n. Knight412.

errant.

3. 276. I-wisse, adv. Indeed, truly, assur Knight aduenturous,n. Knightedly. Obs. or arch. 1. 392 ; 2. errant.

3. 388. 273.

Knock up, phr. To make up

(hastily or off-hand), to arrange Iack, n. † A low-bred or ill-man summarily. Frequently used with

nered fellow, a "knave.' Phr., reference to a match or marriage. play the lacks : to play the knave, 2. 17.

to do mean trick. Ind. 20. Knot-grasse, n. A common plant Ierkin, n. In the 16th and 17th in wet ground, with numerous in

centuries, a close-fitting jacket, tricately branched creeping stems, jersey, or short coat, often made and small pink flowers; an inof leather ; worn by men. Arch. fusion of it was formerly sup5. 71.

posed to stunt the growth.

2. 104. Ioy, v. To enjoy. Arch. 1. 204. tIuggy, n. A familiar substitute Ladie, n. 1. In the days of chiv

for the feminine name Joan, ap alry, a woman chosen by a knight plied as a term of endearment to as the object of his devotion, or a sweetheart or mistress, or as a of some special service. 1. 263, term of endearment. 3. 568.

304 ; 2. 120, 123, 136, &c.

3. 438.

2. The Virgin Mary. Interj. phr., | Light, pp. Obs. past participle of by (by'r) Ladie : contraction of

light. 3. 225. by our Lady used as an oath or Light, v. Obs. preterite of light. expletive. Obs. exc. dial. 1.413. 3. Vocatively. In the sing. Now

Like, a.

Predicatively const. only poet, or rhet. 2. 191, 201. with inf.: likely to. Rare in liter4. The feminine corresponding to ary use, but still common colloq. lord. 4. 457.

Prol. ; Ind. 117; 4. 431. Lam, n. Obs. form of lamb. 3. 309. Like, adv. In like degree, equally. Lame, a. Defective; weak. Fig. Arch. or poet. Ind. 134. I. 33

Like, v.

Phr. impersonal, it likes Lap, v. To take up with the tongue. (one) : (one) is pleased. Arch.

Rarely applied to human beings, and dial. 4.197; 5.120, 135, 136. or used in connection with solid Lim, n. Obs, spelling of limó. I. food. 5. 319.

216. +Laualto, n. *A lively dance for Lingell, n. Arch. A shoemaker's

two persons, consisting a good waxed thread. 5. 322. deal in high and active bounds.' List, n. Inclination, desire. Arch. I. Nares. 3. 611. Cf. note.

392 ; 3. 532 ; 5. 204. Launce, n. Obs. form of lance. Long of, phr. For 'long of= 1. 236, et passim.

along of. Arch, and dial. AtLay, v. 1. To wager, bet. 2.461, tributable to; on account of. 463, 470, 472.

107; 5. 306. 2. To deal blows, attack. Rare Longs, n. Obs. form of lungs. in absol. use. 5. 95.

2. 508. Lay on, phr. intr. To deal blows Loose, v. Obs. form of lose. with vigor 5. 90. *Formerly

423 ; 3. 10. often with dative pron. denoting Louing, ppl.a. 'Means here possesobject of attack. 2. 365.

sing her I love.' Mason. 3. 140. Leading staffe, n. † A staff borne +Lungeis, n. A long, slim, awk

by a commanding officer; a trun ward fellow: a lout. 2. 365 cheon. 5. 340.

Lusty, a. †. Of pleasant appearLeasure, n. Obs. form of leisure, ance, beautiful. 1. 192.

ŤOpportunity to do something spec 2. Strong. Now somewhat arch. ified or implied. 2. 317

in literary use; common in diaLesson, n. +Phr., do (one's) lesson: lects. 4. 15.

to teach (one). 2. 270. Let, n. Hindrance, obstruction.

Maine, a.

1. As an epithet of Arch. I. 82.

force, strength, &c.; exerted to the Let me alone, phr.

full, sheer. 3. 290. trusted. Colloq. 4. 36, 341.

2. Very great considerable. Liberall, a. Of an entertainment, Obs, exc. dial. 5. 124.

&c. : abundant, ample. 3. 185. Maister, n. Obs. form of master. Liberally, adv. Chiefly with ref 1. Applied to an employer.

1. 12, erence to speech : without reserve or restraint ; freely. 1. 17.

2. A title of address now changed Licoras, 1. Obs. form of liquorice. to mister. Arch. Ded.; I. So, 1. 77.

&c. Lie, v. Phrases. I. To lie in : to Maistership,

Obs. form of be in childbed. 3. 450.

mastership. With posses. Pron., 2. To lie open: to be exposed i. e. your maistership. 2. 198. to attack. 3. 374.

Make,z. To do. Arch. in questions

I may be

or

&c.

3. 82.

6

2.

introduced by an objective what. Merry and wise, phr. A proCommon in 16-17th c.

verbial expression. 2. 102 (cf. Make bold, phr. To make (so) note); 5. 68.

bold: to venture, presume so far Merry men, n. Retainers, fol. as, take the liberty (to do some

lowers ? 2. 483. thing). 3. 575.

Me thinkes, phr. It seems to me. Make it to be, phr. Cause it to Arch, and lit. Ind. 85, 103 ; 4.

be. With obj. and inf.; arch. 2 ; 5. 372. when dependent verb is in the + Methridatum, n. In old pharpassive (i. e. make it to be hist). macy, a medicine made of many 3. 325.

ingredients, supposed to be an Mangy, a. †Used as a general term antidote or preservative against of contempt: beggarly, mean,

poison. 1. 278. Cf. note. lousy.' Very common in the Mettle, n. 1. Obs. form of metal, 17th c. 3. 541.

2. 165. Marchant, n. An obs. form of 2. Spirit ; courage ; ardor. Phr.,

merchant. The Speakers Names, lads of mettle. 3. 557. et passim.

fMickle, adv. Much, greatly. March-beere, n. A strong ale or 240.

beer brewed in March. 5. 182. Minion, n. fA bold, forward girl +Marie come vp, phr. Expressive or woman; a minx. 3. 127.

of contempt, or satirical encourage. Miscarry, v. †1. To bring to ment. 3. 579.

misfortune. 2. 351. Marry, interj. Obs. or arch. (Orig. 2. To come to naught; fail in

Mary, Marie, the name of the Vir purpose. 4. 431. gin Mary invoked in oaths) Indeed! | + Mislike, n. Misliking; aversion. forsooth! a term used to express Prol. surprise, asseveration, &c.

Ind.

Misprision, n. +Misunderstanding. 40; marrie, 2. 140; marie, 3. 143, Ded. 575, 603 ; 5. 222.

Mittimus, n.

Warrant for arrest. +Martiall Court, n. Court-martial.

3. IOI. 5. 133.

Moneth, n. Obs. form of month. Maruell, n. †Phr., to have marvel : Ind. 36, et passim.

to be astonished, struck with won Morrice, n. An old country dance. der.

4. 434 (cf. note), 456. Maunger, n. Obs. form of manger.

Moue, v. “To address one's self 2. 410.

to; speak to about an affair. Maw, n. †Stomach ; appetite; hence,

2. 13. inclination. 1. 150.

Mouse, n. A familiar term of enMealed, ppl. a. Sprinkled with dearment. 1. 1oo, et passim. meal. Rare. 5. 5.

Mute, v. 4. 463. Cf. note. Meate, n.

ř1. Dinner. I. 256. 2. Solid food of any kind ; com Napkin, n. †A handkerchief. 4. mon in phr., meat and drink.

474. I. 397, 447 ; 2. 480.

Narrowly, adv. Carefully, atten3. Food in general. Obs. or arch. tively. 5. 83. 4. 375.

Naturall, a. +Lawful, legitimate. Meeke, a. Humble; unpretentious. 3. 540. 1. 297.

Naughty, a. #Bad; worthless ; Member, n. Inhabitant; citizen. good for nothing. 2. 81 ; 4. 31. Obs.?

Necessaries, n. pl. †Things proMerry, adv. Merrily, Ind. 126. vided for the performance of a

2. 221.

Ind. 13.

Ind. 55.

specific purpose. Ind. 70. Cf. | Obeysance, n. Obs. form of obeiapparel.

sance. Phr., to do obeysance : to Need, n. †Necessary service.

2.

make a respectful bow or curtsy. 213.

Now chiefly lit. and arch. 5. Neighbor, n. I. A familiar term

370. of address. Dial, and colloq. 5. Of, prep. Obs. form of off.

2. 341; 118, 128.

3. 375 ; 4. 473 ; 5. 344. 2. One who stands near another. Of, prep. 1. On. Obs., colloq., or 5. 137.

vulgar. 2. 492 ; 3. 330. Nere, adv. A form of ne'er=never. †2. Because of. Mostly obs.

226. Ner'e, adv. Form of ne'er.

1. 342, Off, prep. Obs. form of of. 2. 337. 344

Offence, n. *Wrong, injury. 5. Neuer, adv. 1. Not, emphatically. 23. Ind. 63.

Offend, v. To attack, assault, as2. Not a whit. Obs. ? 4. 409. sail. 3. 83. New, adv. Anew.

1. 5.

Offer, n. 41. Something held out Nice, a. 1. Fastidious ; difficult to as a bribe or means of persuasion ?

please or satisfy. To the Readers. I. 54. Cf, note. +2. Foolish, unwise. 3. 24.

2. Proposal.

I. 118. Nimph, n. Obs. form of nymph. Offer, v.

To attempt to inflict. 5. Maiden ; damsel. Poet. 1. 207. 275. +Niniuy, n. A kind of “motion" toffer to carry (one's) books af

or puppet-show, representing the ter, phr. To attempt to equal. story of Jonah and the whale. 3.

2. 141. 306. Cf. note.

Office, n. Service or function to be +Nipitato, n. Strong ale. А performed. 2. 31. mock Latin word.

4. 100. Cf. Officer, n. A menial or domestic note.

in a great household. 4. 129; 5. No, adv. Not. 5. 400.

336. tNoble Science, Fencing ; Of-spring, n. Obs. form of offscience of defence.'

Cf.

spring. Ded. note.

On, prep. fof. 1. 323 ; 2. 547. +Noddie, n. A simpleton; a fool. Onely, adv. Obs. form of only. 2. 249.

1. 373, et passim. +Noint, v. To anoint.

2. 260 ; On't, phr.

For it = of it. 4. 136.

Common in literary use to c. 1750. No more, phr. +Enough! Silence !

Now dial. or vulgar. I. 323, et 2. 297.

passim. Nor, conj. Correlative to another Obs. or poet.

Or ere, conj. phr. For or e'er = I. 54.

or ever. Intensive of the conj. Nor so, phr. Not at all ; no, no!?

:before.

I. 455.
Obs.? 1. 171. Cf. note.
Notable, a. ti. Notorious. 1.421.

Or ... or, correl, conj. Either ..

Now only poet. 2. 527. 2. Noteworthy; memorable. 4.416. Notably, adv. Excellently; cleverly. Oth, prep. For o’th, a worn down

form of of the. 1. 295. Number, v. To measure, reckon, Ougly, a, Obs. form of ugiy. 3. gauge. 3. II.

256, 282. +Nump, n. Usually numps. A Out alas, interj. phr. An expres.

dolt; a blockhead. 2. 263. Cf. sion of lamentation. Arch. or dial. note.

2. 196.

2. 54.

012

not.

or =

or.

Ind. 29.

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