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c.

2.

fa hill.

2.

twelfth of the sou ; from the 16th | Disquiet, n. †Disquieting feeling

a small copper coin. Hence or circumstance. I. 187. (esp. in negative phrases) used as Dissemble, v. To feign, pretend, the type of a very small sum. simulate. 3. 49. 4. 370.

Distempered, ppl. a. Denoting Depart, v. †To part or separate mental disorder or distraction. Of from each other. 5. 374.

persons (obs. or arch.); their minds, *Desart, n. Obs. form of desert. looks, actions, &c. 3. 82.

ŤAny wild, uninhabited region, in- Diuell, n. Obs. form of devil. cluding forest-land.

1. 263, 305. 164, et passim. Deseruing, vbl. n. Merit or worth. Doome, v. To destine or consign I. 27.

to some adverse fate.

4. 330. Desire, n. Object of desire. 1. 61. Down, n.

2. 115. Desperate, a. †1. Involving serious Dozė, n. Form of dozen. 2. 15. risk and danger.

Dragõ, n. Form of dragon. 2. Extreme; dreadful, 'awful.' 3. 269. 383.

+Dragon's-water, n. A medicinal Deuice, n. Inventive faculty ; in preparation popular in the 17th c.

vention, ingenuity. Arch.and rare. 1. 278. 4. 54.

Draw, v. †To move, proceed. 3. Deuoire, n. †Service due or ren 596.

dered. Phr. service or devoir is Drum, n. milit. One who plays frequently met with.

2. 185.

the drum ; a drummer. 4. 91. Di'de, v. Obs. form of died. 4. Ducke, n. A term of endearment. 277.

2. 381. Diet, n. A course of food pre Duckling, n. †A term of endearscribed in medical treatment.

ment.

2. 223. 188 ; 2. 256 ; 3. 454, 491.

Due, a. +1. Direct? (The dicDiet-bread, n. Special bread pre tionaries do not recognize this

pared for invalids or persons under meaning). †2. Genuine? 4. 443. dietic regimen ; †spec., a preparation Dutch-man, n. †A German ; a for sufferers of the French Pox. man of Teutonic race.

Obs. exc. 3. 472. Cf. note,

locally in the U. S. 3. 298. Ding, v. Arch. or dial. To hit, kock, strike. 3. 622.

Ease, v. To give ease or relief of Discent, n. Obs. form of descent. mind to. 1. 192. 4. 443.

Ease, n. † Pleasure, entertainment. Discharge, v. trefl. To acquit 2. 57.

oneself, fulfil, perform (a trust, a Eie, n. †Phr. bi'th eie (by the eye): part, &c.). Ind. 139.

in unlimited quantity? 2. 94. Discretion, n. † Judgment; deci. Eke, adv. Arch.

Also. 3. 429; sion. 5. 399.

4. 449. Dismal, a. 1. Causing dismay; Ell, n. †A measuring rod. 5. 160.

terrible, dreadful, dire. 3. 279. 'Em, pron. Unstressed form of them. †2. Boding or bringing disaster; Colloq. 1. 69. unlucky, fatal. 3. 362.

Embecill, v. Obs. form of embezzle. Dispatch, v. 1. To dispose of by †To waste or dissipate in extrakilling. Phr. to dispatch out of

vagance.

2. 170. the way. 3. 317.

Emperall, n. Obs. form of imperial. 2. To execute speedily. 5. 247. An imperial personage. In 16-17th Disport, n. Pastime, sport. Arch. c. used as = emperor. 2. 179. 4. 457.

Cf. note.

I.

Engine, n. An implement, a

mechanical contrivance. Arch. in the general sense.

Spec., a comb.

3. 268.

appeal is made to justify or authorize any course of action. Obs. or arch.

5. 139. Extant, a.

Standing forth to view : in early use with phr. extant to be seen : prominent, conspicuous, man

ifest. Arch. 2. 306. Extraordinary, řadv. Extraordi

narily. 1. 408.

n.

4. 198.

I.

Enormity, n. A transgression, crime.

3. 259. Enow, n. Arch, and dial. The

plural of enough. 4. 311. Entertain, n. Reception of a guest; entertainment.

2. 399, 425. Entertaine, v. †To maintain re

lations with a person). 3. 74. Entertainment, Hospitable

provision for the wants of a guest ; esp. provision for the table. Arch.

5. 273. Entreate, v. 1. To ask earnestly

for.
2. To beseech, implore. With

obj. clause om., rare. 5. 242. Er'e, adv. Obs. form of ever.

346. Errant, a. 1. Traveling, roaming

(in quest of adventure, or like a
knight-errant). Poet. or arch. 1.
289; 2. 139.
2. Said of knights who traveled
about in search of adventures.

2. 188, et passim. Errant, n. Obs. form of errand.

In an elevated or dignified sense: here, an expedition of rescue. Arch. or poet.

2. 441. Erst, adv. + Just a little while since.

4. 463. Estate,n. Worldly possession, property, fortune.

Arch. I. 394. Esteeme, v. †Phr., esteeme of : to hold opinion of.

I. 374. Estimation, n. #Repute; worth

in the opinion of others. 5. 138. † Ettin, n. †A giant or goblin.

Nares says that the word, because of its etymology (from A. S. etan, to eat), implies cannibalism.

257. Euen, adv. Exactly, precisely, “just.'

Arch. Ded. 1. 12, 219 (e'ne). Ewe, n. Obs. form of yew. Twigs

of the tree used at funerals. 4.

304. Example, n. A precedent to which

women.

Factor, n. An agent to buy and sell goods.

I. 16. +Fading, n. The name of an Irish

dance. 4. 5. Cf. note. Faine, a. † Apt, wont, prone.

386. Faint, v. To lose heart or courage,

be afraid. 5. 16 Faire, a. 1. Promising, favorable.

1. 10; 5. 163.
2. Just. 1. 41.
†3. Of language, diction : elegant.
Comb. with spoken, i. e. fair.
spoken i. 267 ; 2. 43.
74. Used in courteous or respect.
ful address. I. 270, 317 ; 2. 315,
420; 3. 189, 295 ; 4. 410.
†5. Desirable, reputable. 2. 35.
6. In conventional application to

I. 304 ; 2. 44, 54. 17. Reputable. 5. 105. Faire, adv. †1. Fully, completely.

Obs. or dial. Phr., faire growne.
3. 304.
†2. Without haste or violence.

5. 102, 151. Faire, n. One of the fair sex ;

esp. a beloved woman. Arch. or

poet. 4. 318. Fairelie, adv. † Courteously, re

spectfully. 2. 212. Faith, n. Phrases tr. By the faith

a my body. Quasi-oath. 2. 215;
3. 143
2. By (my) faith (and troth). Quasi-
oath. 1, 218, 264.
3. I faith, l'faith, i'faith. (Reduced
from in faith, and used interjec-
tionally). In truth. Arch. Ind.
141, et passim.
4. V pon (my) faith. Quasi-oath.

I.

I. 81.

To re

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'Faith, interj. Shortened from in +Fellow like, a. Like a companion ;

(good) faith. In truth. Arch. companionable. 3. 542.
exc. dial.
I. 221.

Fetch, v. 1. Phr., fetch up: to Faith, interj. In or on one's faith. produce ; cause to come forth,

Obs. or arch. 1. 255, et passim. bring to light. Ind. 76. Fall, n. tCondition, lot. 1. 4; 4. †2. To have at,' reach, strike 206.

(a person). 3. 380. Falsifie, v. † Fencing term : to 3. To cause to come, as by a sum

make (a blow) under cover of a mons or constraining force. Now feint. 3. 373.

rare. Ind. 120; 2. 174. Farre, v. intr. for reft.

4. Bring.

1. 462 ; 2. 558; 4. 43, Obs. exc.

dial.

5. 14. 426. Cf. note.

Feth, interj. Obs. form of faith. Fashion, n. +Pretence ; assumed In or on one's faith, Obs, or arch. behaviour. 4. 156.

3. 334. Fathame, n. Obs. form of fathom. Field, n. fin pl. used in collective Ind. 88.

to denote the country as Fault, n. † 1. An unsound or dam opposed to the town (spec. the aged place; a flaw. 5. 122.

country environs of London, i. e. †2. A deficiency, lack, want. 5. Mile-end, &c., set apart for military 146.

drills)? Battle-fields ? 5. 159. Fauour, 1. Phr., by your Fiery, a. Fire-bearing ; esp. of an fauour : by your leave, permission, arrow, shaft, &c.

Lit. and fig: pardon. Obs. or arch. Ind. 17.

3. 481. 2. Attractiveness, charm ; something Filching, vbl. n. Stealing, esp. in which conciliates good-will. Obs. a small, sly way. Originally exc. arch. 2. 140.

slang, and, as such, first recorded 3. In mediævel chilvalry, something in the 16th c. 2. 493 given by a lady to her knight, as Fild, pp. Obs. form of filled. 5. 25. a sleeve, glove, or knot of ribbons, Fill, v. With the introduced conto be worn as a token of affection. tents as object : to put (wine, &c.) Arch. 4. 109, 111.

into a vessel with the view of Feard, ppl. a. Frightened. Obs. filling it; hence, pour out. Obs. exc. dial.

exc. arch.

3. 612, 636 ; 5. 351. Feare, v. †1. To frighten. Ind. 78. Fine, adv. Well. Obs. exc. dial.

12. To have fear for ; have anx 2. 248.
iety about.
4. 344.

Fine spoken, a. Using fine phrases ; †Feateously, adv. Cleverly ; dex polite in language. 1. 362.

terously ; nimbly ; properly. 4.456. Fire-drake, n. Fiery dragon. Fegary, n. (A corruption of va 350.

gary). Dial.and colloq. A whim ; Fit, v. †To supply with that which

a wild freak; a prank. 2. 273. is fit or suitable. Obs. when the Fellow, n. 1. Contemptuously : a object is a person. 4. 362. person of no esteem or worth

+Flappet, n. Atlapor edge, as (felow obs. form). 1. 33 ; 3. 542.

of a counter. I. 277. 2. Compeer; equal in ability or Flea, v. Obs. form of flay. 1. 371. qualities ; a match.'

†Flirt Gill, n. A woman of light 3. Companion, comrade. Now or loose behaviour.

4. 33 rare exc. in pl., or with const. in. Flocke, n.

A band or company 4. 445.

(of persons). 4. 444. +Fellow-feeler, n. A sympathizer. Fond, n. 1. Unwise ; mad. Obs. 3. 563.

exc. dial. 3. 355, 366 ; 5. 6, 10. т

Ind. 77.

2.

2. 44.

over.

rence.

1

I. 434.

2. Infatuated, foolish, silly. Obs. †Gally-foist, n. A barge of state. exc. dial. Ded ; 5. 36.

5. 187. Cf. note. 3. Of sentiments, &c. : cherished Game, n. † Diversion, pastime; or entertained with strong or un hence, spec., amorous sport or reasoning affection.

5. 42.

play? Scheme, intrigue, underFoote, v. To move the foot, step, taking, followed up like a game?

or tread to measure or music; to 1. 140.
dance. Esp. in phr. to foot it. +Gaskins, n. A kind of loose
4. 456.

breech or hose. Chiefly pl. 2.
+For and, conj. phr. And more 104.
2. 184.

Gastly, a. Obs. form of ghastly. Forked, a. †1. Of an arrow : barbed. +Causing terror, terrible. 3. 452 ; 5. 318, 359.

5. 22. 12. • Horned,' cuckolded. 5.361, +Gent, a. Of women and children : Cf. note.

graceful, elegant, pretty. Phr. Forsooth, adv. In truth, truly. Ladies gent is of frequent occur. 1. 360, et passim.

3. 262, 360. Fort, phr. Obs. contraction of for Gentle, a. 1. Of birth, blood, &c. : it. 2. 13.

distinguished by birth or position ; Forward, a. Ready, eager. 2 252. of the class of 'gentlemen.' I. Foule, n. Something evil ; ill-luck. 90; 3. 235, 507, 593.

+Phr., foule chiue him : may evil +2. Of actions, &c. : courteous, success attend him.

considerate,

1. 117 Free-man, n. One who possesses

3. Having the character and manthe freedom of a city, borough, ners appropriate to good birth and company, &c. Ind. 15.

station. Freq. in the phr. a gentle Friend, n. ta lover. I. 44 ; 2. knight. 2. 120, 125, 202, 408 ;

246; 3. 7, 27, 81; 4. 281, 333. 3. 161, 190, 264, 500. Fright, v. To scare, terrify. Now Get, v. †To win. 3. 131.

rare exc. poet. and Sc. 3. 81, Get (oneself) up, vbl. phr. refl. 149.

To betake oneself up from a place. Frighted, ppl. a. Affected with Common in the imperative. Arch. fright. 3. 5.

4. 153. Frolocke, a. Obs. form of frolic. Gird, n. A gibe, taunt.

† Joyous, merry, mirthful. 3. 612. mon use, c. 1580-1700; now Froward, a. Now only lit. Dis. somewhat arch. Ind. 10.

posed to go counter to what is Giue, v. For (one's) mind, &c. : demanded; perverse, refractory. to suggest unfavorably ; misgive.

1. 123 ; 3. 46. Frowningst, ppl. a. Superlative | Giue ear, phr. To give heed; pay

of frowning. That frowns; stern; attention. 5. 154. threatening. 2. 516.

Giue (one's) hand, phr. iTo

pledge (oneself). 3. 331. Gad, n. Rare exc. arch. (Minced Go hard, phr. With but introdu

pronunciation of God.) Substitu cing a statement of what will ted for God, esp. in phr. by Gad. happen unless prevented by over.

powering circumstances. 5. 395. Gaine, n. +Source of gain (i. e. Gold, n. † The metal as used for goods). I. 21.

the ornamentation of fabrics. 4. Gallowes, n. One deserving the gallows; a gallows-bird. Arch. Go (one's) waies, phr.

1. Take I. 421.

your y; go about your busi

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In com

Ind. 113

Ind. 70.

51, 60,

manner.

I. 5.

2.

a

ness ; or used as a mere expletive. groat ceased to be issued for cirObs. or arch. 2. 42, 295 ; 4. 29; culation in 1662, and was not 5. 371.

afterwards coined under that name. 2. Common when bidding a per 4. 138, 369. son to be gone ; used in a kindly Grocery, n. Grocers. Ind. 97. Dial. 1. 220, 335.

Cf. note. Good, n. *A good quality, virtue. Ground, n. The solid bottom unRare. 3. 76.

derlying the sea. Nautical. Ind. 88. Good-man, n. †Used as a title +Grout-nole, n. A blockhead, of address, orig. to yeomen or thickhead, dunce.

2. 413. farmers; here used derisively. Ind. Grow, v. 1. To advance, progress. 6; 2. 295.

Phr., to grow toward. Rare. 3. Gossip, n. ta hoydenish 'gad 513 about '' 4. 154. Cf. note.

2. To come by degrees (const. to Gouerne, v. To administer, man with inf.) Rare. 4. 261. age. I. 440.

Growth, n. Advancement. Grace, n. 1. Phr., grace of God: Gut, n. Guts, intestines. (Employ

an Expression signifying the re ment of the sing. in the general generative and sanctifying influence sense is rare.) 1. 96. of God. 1. 360.

A courtesy-title given to Ha, v. A worn-down form of have. monarch, and serving as a com Colloq. or dial. 2. 146, et passim. plimentaty periphrasis. Phr., the +Ha, pron. He. 3. 546; 4. 193. great Turkes grace.

Obs. exc.

Habits, n. Dress; costume. Arch. arch. 1. 483.

Prol. 3. Sense of duty or propriety. | +Halter-sacke,n. A gallows-bird : Phr., have the (any) grace (to a term of obloquy. 1. 372.

do or be something). 2. 222. Hamper, v. 1. To impede; enGrace, v. + To show favor or be cumber with difficulties. I. 380. gracious to. 3. 504.

†2. To restrain by confinement. Grant, n. Consent, permission. 1. 194.

Hard, adv. + With an uneasy or Grant, v. †To sanction, permit. uncomfortable pace. 3. 435. 5. 202.

Harnesse, n. Armour. Hist. or Gratious, a. Obs. form of gracious. arch. 4. 3.

Condescendingly beneficent. Often, +Hartely, adv. With the heart; as here, used in sarcastic or play earnestly, sincerely. 1. 184; 3. ful application. 4. 444.

604 ; 5. 292. Greene, n.

A grassy spot. Rare. Has. Form of h'as, an obs. con2. 304.

traction of he has. I. 116. Griefe, n. 41. Physical illness or +Haue vp, phr. Stand up! get pain. Prol.

up! brace yourself! 3. 377.

Cf. +2. Feeling of offence; displeasure, note. anger. 2. 33.

Hawlk, n. Obs. form of hawk. Grimely, a. Obs. or arch. Grim 4. 379. looking 2. 478.

Head-peece, n.

A piece of armour Groat, n. A silver coin in circu for the head, a helmet. 2. 330.

lation after the 13th c., but va Heart, n. Phrases. +1. My heart!: rying in intrinsic value in different an ejaculation of surprise, &c. 3. countries and periods. The Eng 103 lish groat coined in 1351-2 was

2. Deere heart : a term of endearade equal to four pence. The ment. 3. 150.

3. 106.

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