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CLASS 4, GROUP 4—For the best exhibit of commercial varieties as representing

the section or state from which it comes, and to be composed of not more than five (5) summer, five (5) fall and ten (10) winter varieties, the following prizes are offered:

First Prize-Silver Medal and Blue Ribbon.
Second Prize-Bronze Medal and Red Ribbon.
Third Prize--Bronze Medal and White Ribbon.
The exhibits in this class are limited to the following territory:

GROUP 4.
Colorado

Washington
Utah .........

.. Oregon
Idaho

California
Montana .......

British Columbia
New Mexico ..

(Canada)

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The President's Cup-Sweepstakes Prize

Cleveland Exhibit 1913

SPECIAL CLASS. THE PRESIDENT'S CUP--SWEEPSTAKES PRIZE. The two exhibits scoring the highest in each group, as determined by the specifications applicable to that group, will be selected to form this class. For the best exhibit of commercial varieties in this class and as representing the state or section from which it comes, the President, Mr. R. H. Pennington, offers a Silver Cup. No person, however, will be allowed more than one prize. The exhibit, therefore, ranking second in the Group which takes the Silver Cup will be awarded the first prize in that Group. The judges, in their preliminary determinations, will, therefore, make one more award than the prize list calls for, to provide for this necessity.

SPECIAL CLASS-SINGLE PLATES.

(Open to all Groups.) For the best exhibit of one plate of any one commercial variety, as representing the section or state from which it comes, the following prizes are offered:

First Prize-Bronze Medal and Blue Ribbon.

Second Prize-Bronze Medal and Red Ribbon.

This class requires a separate exhibit from the Group Classes. The plates are not interchangeable. In other words a plate cannot be withdrawn from the Group Classes to fill this class. The same varieties, of course, can be entered in both classes, but not the same identical apples. Exhibitors entering both classes should use due care to clearly specify the particular fruit intended for this special class so that no error may occur.

BASIS OF JUDGING. In judging the Exhibit, the following features will be considered and will count when perfect as the scale of points indicates. The scale is the standard of perfection and indicates the relative importance of the various points. Exhibits will be judged on this basis. .... Scale of Points.

Standard QUALITY—(Including appearance, smootheness, regularity of form and

freedom from blemish) ...... SIZE-(As representing section from which it comes at that season of the year ........................

40 COLOR-(As representing the section from which it comes at that sea

son of the year)' .......

.....................................

50

10

100 It should be noted that COLOR is relatively UNIMPORTANT. This was made so because the season is not far enough advanced on August 1st to allow it to be given a greater value.

GENERAL NOTES.

PURPOSE OF THE EXHIBIT. To show the DEVELOPMENT and CONDITION of the COMMERCIAL varieties in the various sections, states and groups at that season of the year, i. e., the first of August.

It is fully recognized that fruit is not matured by August 1st. The question of MATURITY has nothing to do with this exhibit. We want to see how the crop has PROGRESSED up to that time, and an immature apple has just as great a chance as a matured apple, providing it is up to the standard for its particular section or state at that season of the year..

IN OTHER WORDS THE VARIETY OF SEASONS IN THE VARIOUS STATES IS TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT BY THE JUDGES IN MAKING THEIR AWARDS, AND EVERYONE IS ON AN EQUAL FOOTING, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER THE FRUIT IS FULL GROWN OR NOT.

WHAT TO EXHIBIT. (1) WE WANT THIS YEAR'S FRUIT. Tako it as it is on or about August 1st.

(2) PICKED FRUIT OR FRUIT ON THE BRANCHES, OR BOTH, ARE EQUALLY WELCOME. At the preceding exhibits small branches with the fruit on them have been shown with much profit. This indicates the development of the fruit, distribution, foliage, etc. You may exhibit either way or both ways, as you prefer. We suggest sending both, if convenient. However, do not feel that it is necessary. (3) Commercial Varieties are wanted, and the awards will be upon this basis.

WHO MAY EXHIBIT. It is open to the world. Anyone is welcome-growers, dealers, consumers, associations .or selling agencies, whether the fruit exhibited is raised by them or not. It is not necessary that the fruit cxhibited be raised by the person who exhibits it, or that it come from a single orchard or a single owner. It must, however, be exhibited as the product of the state where it was actually raised.

NUMBER OF VARIETIES. It is not necessary that you exhibit the full MAXIMUM number of varieties mentioned in the CLASS RULES to be eligible to an award, providing your exhibit, whatever its number, truly represents the COMMERCIAL VARIETIES of the state or section it purports to represent. You may also exhibit a greater number of varieties than required, with the understanding that the excess is not to be considered in competition.

HOW TO SEND AN EXHIBIT. 1. Keep each variety SEPARATE with the NAME of the variety clearly indicated. Enclose in the package an invoice giving all the varieties sent and your name and address. Specify whether the varieties are summer, fall or winter.

2. If you do not bring your exhibit personally, send it by express, or any way you choose, to E. W. J. HEARTY, COPLEY-PLAZA HOTEL, BOSTON, MASS., Chairman of the Committee in charge of the exhibit.

3. FILL OUT THE ENCLOSED SHIPPING NOTICE AND INVOICE AND MAIL IT TO MR. HEARTY AT THE ABOVE ADDRESS, SO THAT HE MAY ARRANGE SPACE, TRACE DELAYED SHIPMENTS AND AVOID ERRORS. THIS IS VERY IMPORTNT. DO NOT FAIL.

4. Exhibits in many instances may undoubtedly be sent by parcels post if carefully packed, protected and started in time. The weight limit varies from 20 lbs. to 50 lbs. according to the distance from Boston.

WHEN TO SEND YOUR EXHIBIT.
Time it to arrive at Boston, MONDAY, AUGUST 3rd, OR NOT LATER THAN
TUESDAY, A. M., THE 5th.

SPECIAL NOTES.
1. You are welcome to arrange your own exhibit.
2. No entrance fee is charged.

3. No exhibitor shall enter more than one exhibit in the Group Classes and one in the Single Plate Classes from the same state or province. 4. No exhibitor shall receive more than one prize.

SEND AN EXHIBIT. The exhibit last year was the best yet held. This year we have large quarters, excellent prizes and elaborate arrangements. SEE THAT YOUR SECTION IS REPRESENTED.

IT IS A GREAT ADVERTISEMENT. It pays to advertise. Show what you have. There is no better place or better time throughout the year. This show gets all sections together. It brings the buyer and seller into close relation. It broadens one's view. It is one of the most important features of the meeting and is rapidly coming to be the most important.

BOSTON SPECIAL COMMITTEE

In charge of Exhibit.
E. W. J. Hearty, Chairman, 40 Central St., Boston, Mass.

G. H. Taylor, Boston. W. G. Rolfe, Boston.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND EXTRA COPIES OF THE RULES,
ADDRESS THE SECRETARY, R. G. PHILLIPS, 612 MERCANTILE BUILDING,
ROCHESTER, N. Y.

WHERE PAT DREW THE LINE. Pat had been at work for three days digging a well, and as the foreman wanted it finished within the week he had promised Pat another man to help him. It was getting on to 11 o'clock, and Towser, the foreman's bulldog, was looking over the edge of the pit, when Pat said to himself, "I'll have a smoke." He had filled his pipe and was about to light it when he glanced up and beheld Towser's handsome features. Slowly removing his pipe from his mouth he said, “Be-e-gorra, Oi've worked with Germans and Hungarians, and Oi've worked with Oitalians, but if a man wid a face like that comes down here to work beside me Oi gets up.”—(Exchange.)

United States. Such types must conform to the standards provided for by Section One, or multiples, subdivisions or derivative values thereof.

Sections Three and Four provide for the registration and publication of each type approved by the Bureau and prohibits the sale of any device which has not been approved.

Sections Five and Six provide that the name of the maker shall be stamped or etched upon all weighing and measuring devices and create penalties for false marking.

Sections Seven, Eight and Nine provide machinery for the enforcement of the Act.

Section Ten defines terms.

UNIFORM COLD STORAGE LAW_Walter E. Coe, of Stamford, Conn., Chairman of the Committee on Purity of Articles of Commerce of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, has recently prepared a second draft of a proposed law regulating cold storage. This will be submitted to the next meeting of the National Conference which will be held in the fall.

Space will not permit the publication of the Act in full. If you are interested, send for a copy. The time limit or storage period is fixed at twelve months and re-storage is permitted unless the articles have been removed for the purpose of being placed on the market for sale to consumers. Goods may be transferred from one warehouse to another and the act does not apply to refrigerator cars. The term "food” is to be construed to mean and include fresh meat and fresh meat products, except in process of manufacture, fresh food fish, game, poultry, eggs and butter. The Act, therefore, would not apply to fruit.

STANDARDIZATION-Never before in all the history of the United States has so much interest been manifested in this important subject as right now.

For over one hundred years it was impossible to persuade Congress to act. The trail, however, was finally blazed by the passage of the Sulzer Bill in 1912 and since then it has not only been easier to make progress but the encouragement thereby fostered has materially swelled the ranks of the pioneers in this field. Certain fundamental principles of law, fact and necessity were there established and if the Sulzer Bill never does anything more, it is entitled to immortality as the forerunner and the inspiration of better days.

"Hope deferred maketh the heart sick.” No longer do people need to cry, “What is the use? we can't do anything.” Something can be done and is being done. We are entering a new era in the history of standardization. The dawn is here and we prophesy that it will not be long before the full sunrise comes.

National departments, state officials from ocean to ocean, trade organizations and members of Congress are taking a real interest in standardization. You will note the measure just introduced by Mr. Ashbrook of Ohio. Before long there should be prepared a general national bill covering all commodities and settling these questions for the whole United States. In that way will UNIFORMITY be brought to pass and the wretched uncertainty and foolish discrepancies of the present abolished. For example, it is a crime against the commercial life of today that 46 lbs. should constitute a bushel of some commodity in one state while 55 lbs. are required to constitute a bushel of the same commodity in an adjoining state.

STANDARDIZATION IS ONE OF THE BIG QUESTIONS CONFRONTING COMMERCE TODAY. The problem will be solved. As business men, it is up to you to see that it is solved correctly.

The Standard Barrel and Box Bills Both Bills Reported Favorably--Success Crowns Real Work

SHE re-hearing on the Standard Fruit and Vegetable

Barrel Bill, otherwise known as the Tuttle-Weeks Bill, and concerning which you have been closely advised, was held before the House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures on Tuesday and Wednesday,

May 26th and 27th. Large delegations were present representing the various interests involved.

The three trade organizations were represented by R. S. French of the National League, W. L. Wagner, Samuel E. Lux and W. M. Roylance of the Western Fruit Jobbers, and R. G. Phillips of the International Apple Shippers' Association. The Cranberry Association had a large delegation present from Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Wisconsin, headed by A. U. Chaney. The Virginia Potato Growers, with an output of 2,500,000 barrels, were represented by Mr. Westcott. The National Conference of Weights and Measures officials, then in session at Washington, appointed a special committee of five, with Dr. L. A. Fischer of the Bureau of Standards at the head, to attend the hearings and support the measure. Hon. William E. Tuttle of New Jersey, introducer of the Bill and the earnest friend of standardization, was in general charge of the presentation of the case.

Keen interest was shown throughout, not only by the House Committee and the delegations present, but also by a large number of congressmen from many sections who appeared and spoke on behalf of the bill. Adjournment was taken until Friday, May 29th, when the Committee gave it final consideration in executive session.

We are advised by wire that the Tuttle Bill was reported favorably and substantially in the form desired by those interested. At the time of this writing the bill as reported has not been received by us, but as soon as it is, publication will be made if there is any material change from the Senate Bill as passed and which received the unanimous approval of all parties.

On Wednesday, the 27th, the last day of the hearing, the Box Bill was also called up and a favorable report urged. It is a pleasure to advise that such action was taken by the House Committee on Friday, the 29th.

This bill has been heretofore published in full and you are

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