The Works, in Verse and Prose

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R. and J. Dodsley, 1764
 

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第 193 頁 - I have heard her with sweetness unfold How that pity was due to a dove, That it ever attended the bold ; And she call'd it the sister of love. But her words such a pleasure convey, So much I her accents adore, Let her speak, and whatever she say, Methinks, I should love her the more.
第 192 頁 - I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed; But let me that plunder forbear, She will say 'twas a barbarous deed...
第 196 頁 - I have nothing to do but to weep. Yet do not my folly reprove ; She was fair — and my passion begun ; She smil'd — and I could not but love ; She is faithless — and I am undone.
第 148 頁 - Unfair defign, and ruthlefs deed ! Soon would the vine his wounds deplore, And yield her purple gifts no more ; Ah foon, eras'd from every grove ' . Were DELIA'S name, and STREPHON'S love.
第 191 頁 - To visit some far distant shrine, If he bear but a relique away, Is happy, nor heard to repine. Thus, widely remov'd from the fair, Where my vows, my devotion I owe ; Soft hope is the relique I bear, And my solace wherever I go.
第 191 頁 - But a sweet-brier entwines it around, Not my fields, in the prime of the year, More charms than my cattle unfold; Not a brook that is limpid and clear, But it glitters with fishes of gold.
第 196 頁 - Thus glide the foft numbers along, And he fancies no fhepherd his peer ; ——Yet I never mould envy the fong, Were not PHYLLIS to lend it an ear. Let his crook be with hyacinths bound, So PHYLLIS the trophy defpife ; Let his forehead with laurels be crown'd, So they fhine not in PHYLLIS'S eyes.
第 197 頁 - Alas ! from the day that we met, What hope of an end to my woes? When I cannot endure to forget The glance that undid my repose. Yet time may diminish the pain: The flower, and the shrub, and the tree, Which I rear'd for her pleasure in vain, In time may have comfort for me.
第 11 頁 - If the Author has hazarded, throughout, the use of English or modern allusions, he hopes it will not be imputed to an entire ignorance, or to the least disesteem of the ancient learning. He has kept the ancient plan and method in his eye, though he builds his edifice with the materials of his own nation.
第 189 頁 - What it is, to admire and to love, And to leave her we love and admire. Ah lead forth my flock in the morn, And the damps of each ev'ning repel ; Alas ! I am faint and forlorn : — I have bade my dear Phyllis farewel.

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