The Tentacles of Progress: Technology Transfer in the Age of Imperialism, 1850-1940

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Oxford University Press, 1988年3月10日 - 416 頁
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This penetrating examination of a paradox of colonial rule shows how the massive transfers of technology--including equipment, techniques, and experts--from the European imperial powers to their colonies in Asia and Africa resulted not in industrialization but in underdevelopment. Examining the most important technologies--shipping and railways, telegraphs and wireless, urban water supply and sewage disposal, economic botany and plantation agriculture, irrigation, and mining and metallurgy--Headrick provides a new perspective on colonial economic history and reopens the debate on the roots of Asian and African underdevelopment.
 

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內容

1 Imperialism Technology and Tropical Economies
3
2 Ships and Shipping
18
3 The Railways of India
49
4 The Imperial Telecommunications Networks
97
5 Cities Sanitation and Segregation
145
6 Hydraulic Imperialism in India and Egypt
171
7 Economic Botany and Tropical Plantations
209
8 Mining and Metallurgy
259
9 Technical Education
304
10 Experts and Enterprises
352
11 Technology Transfer and Colonial Politics
379
Bibliographical Essay
385
Index
391
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第 3 頁 - You cannot maintain a net of railways over an immense country without introducing all those industrial processes necessary to meet the immediate and current wants of railway locomotion, and out of which there must grow the application of machinery to those branches of industry not immediately connected with railways. The railway system will therefore become, in India, truly the forerunner of modern industry.
第 4 頁 - There are today on the plains of India and China men and women, plague-ridden and hungry, living lives little better, to outward appearance, than those of the cattle that toil with them by day and share their places of sleep at night. Such Asiatic standards, and such unmechanized horrors, are the lot of those who increase their numbers without passing through an industrial revolution
第 3 頁 - But when you have once introduced machinery into the locomotion of a country, which possesses iron and coals, you are unable to withhold it from its fabrication. You cannot maintain a net of railways over an immense country without introducing all those industrial processes necessary to meet the immediate and current wants of railway locomotion, and out of which there must grow the application of machinery to those branches of industry not immediately connected with railways.

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