網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

249
280
280
280
281
312
312

312

Tracy de Vore

24, 40
Let not the sun go down upon your
wrath

56
The Poet's Wreath ::

56
Night

56
This is the Hour for me

57
The Loved One was not there

57
I miss thee, my Mother

72
There's a Star in the West.

73
The Fairy of the Sea..

73
The Ploughshare of Old England

88
The Forest Trees

88
Away from the Revel

89
The Sailor's Grave

89
My Grave

89
The Wreaths...

104
Kings

105
The King of the Wind

105
Hang up his Harp, he'll wake no

105
The Bow

120

Fragment
Lines written to beguile an idle

Hour ..
The Grandfather's Stick
A Song for merry Harvest
The First Voyage
To Fancy
The Old Water-mill
On seeing a Birdcatcher
Children's Welcoming
Dinna forget Me
The Dead
Through the Waters..
My Native Home
Music
Song of the Sea-gulls
Duncan Lee
Loch Leven's gentle Stream
Song of the Mariners
The Star of iny Home
Wedding Bells

121
136
136
137
137
152
152
153
153
153
185
185
233
233
231
248
248
349
249

The Brave
The Homes of the Dead
Time
Our Native Song
Stanzas to the Young
Song for the New Year
The Thames
The King's Old Hall..
Love on
The Last Look
The Flag of the Free
The Old Straw Hat
Curls and Couplets
The Slumber of Death
Stanzas..
I thank thee, God! for weal and

313
344
345
345
376
408
408

408

woe
Charlie O'Ross, wi' the sloe-black

Een
The Fisher-Boy jollily lives
Stanzas..

409
409
409

more ..

[ocr errors]

NOW PUBLISHING,

Commencing in the First Number of the Sixth Volume,

NOVEL AND ENTERTAINING NOTES

OF

“AN AUTUMN TRIP THROUGH MUNSTER.”

VOLUMES I. TO V., BOUND IN GREEN CLOTH, PRICE 4s. 6. EACH.

VOLUMES I., II., AND III.,

CONTAIN

NUMEROUS SHORT STORIES WRITTEN EXPRESSLY FOR CHILDREN.

1

[graphic][subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

GREAT MEN’S WIVES.

cator of the Family—the alma mater ; and thus, through her instrunientality, was the regeneration of the world

secured. Great men are not always great with their wives. Great But it did not follow that all women were good, or that geniuses have often a seedy side, and this is precisely the all were happy. Life is but a tangled yarn at the best ; side of their nature with which wives are the most there are blanks and prizes drawn by women still, and not familiar. The world sees the intellect, and the intellect unfrequently " great men” have proved the greatest of only in the Great Genius's Book, but knows little or blanks to them. Henry the Eighth was not, perhaps, nothing of the man himself, his nature, his temper, his entitled to the appellation of a great man, though he was foibles, and all that makes up his daily life. The world an author, for which the Pope conferred on him the title, is wonderfully tolerant of its geniuses, as it should be; still retained by our monarchs, of “ Defender of the the world sees their bright side, and that only, and it Faith.” The history of his six wives is well known. worships. The wife sees the man, and the man only; Nor was the married life of Peter the Great, and his three not the author, the sage, or the statesman. What is his wives, of a more creditable complexion. fame in the outer world to her? Is not the home her Luther married Catherine de Bora, an escaped nunworld, where her life and happiness centre ?

a remarkably handsome woman. In his letters to his Probably, greatness does not conform with domesticity. friends, he spoke of her as “My rib Kitty, my loved The literary man is wrapped up in his hooks, and the Kitty, my empress Kitty.” A year after his marriage, wife does not brook a divided affection. He lives in the when struggling with poverty, he said, in one of these past or the future, and his mind can with difficulty be letters, “Catherine, my dear rib, salutes you. She is brought to condescend to the carking cares of the present quite well, thank God; gentle, obedient, and kind in all --perhaps not even to its quiet daily life. His lofty me things ; quite beyond my hopes. I would not exchange ditations are disturbed by the puling infant, or it may be, my poverty with her, for all the riches of Croesus without by a call for house-rent, or the amount of the chandler's her.” A dozen years after, he said, -“Catherine, thou bill. Or, take the leader of some great political or social hast a pious man who loves thee; thou art a very emmovement ; or the commander of armies, at wbose nod press !" Yet Luther had his little troubles in connection ten thousand swords are unsheathed and the air made with his married life. Catherine was fond of small talk, blatant with the discharge of artillery; can you expect and, when Luther was busily engaged in solving the difti. such a person to subside into the quiet, husband-life, culties of the Bible, she would interrupt him with such like any common, ordinary man, and condescend to questions as—whether the king of France was richer than inquire into the state of the children's teething, Johnny's his cousin the emperor of Germany? if the Italian woprogress at school, and the thousand little domestic atten- men were more beautiful than the German? if Rome was tions which constitute a wife's happiness ?

as big 'as Wittenberg ? and so on. To escape these little We shall not, however, discuss the question of whether inquiries, Luther saw no other way than to lock himself happiness in marriage be compatible with genius, or not, up in his study, with a quantity of bread and cheese, and but proceed to set forth a few traits of the wives of great there hold to his work. But Catherine still pursued him.

We shall not dwell on Xantippe, the wife of One day, when he was thus locked up, labouring at his Socrates, whose name has become familiar to us almost as translation of the Twenty-second Psalm, the door was a proverb. But she was not without her uses, for assailed by the wife. No answer was given. More she taught her great husband at least the virtue of pa- knocking followed, accompanied by Catherine's voice, tience. Many of the great Greeks and Romans, like shouting—“ If you don't open the door, 1 will go fetch Socrates, were unhappy in their wives. Possibly, how the locksmith.” The Doctor entreated his wife not to ever, we have heard only of the bad ones among them ; interrupt bis labours. “Open, open!” repeated Cafor the life of good wives is rarely made matter of com- therine. The doctor obeyed. "I was afraid,” said she, ment by the biographer, either in ancient or modern on entering, “ that something had vexed you, locked times,

up in this room alone.” To which Luther replied, The advent of Christianity placed woman in a greatly "The only thing that vexes me now is yourself.” But improved position, as regarded marriage. Repudiation, Luther, doubtless, entertained a steady, though sober as among the Greeks and Romans, was no longer per- affection for his wife ; and in his will, in which be left her mitted; the new religion enforced the unity and indis- sole executrix, bequeathing to her all his property, he solubility of marriage; it became a sacrament, dispensed speaks of her as always a gentle, pious, and faithful at the altar, where woman had formerly been a victim, wife to me, and that has loved me tenderly.” “What. but was now become an idol. The conjugal union was ever,” he adds, "may happen to her after my death, I made a religious contract; the family was constituted by have, I say, full confidence that she will ever conthe priest ; the wife was elevated to the function of Edu- duct herself as a good mother towards her children,

men.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

a

a

and will conscientiously share with them whatever she espoused an actress, and she proved a coquette. He bepossesses.”

came extremely jealous, and, perhaps, he had reason. The other German Reformer, Calvin, proceeded in his Yet he loved her passionately, and bore long with her search for a wife in a matter-of-fact way. He wrote to frailties. He thus himself describes her:-“ She has his friends, describing to them what sort of an article he small eyes, but they are full of fire, brilliant, and the wanted, and they looked up a proper person for him. most penetrating in the world. She has a large mouth, Writing to Farel, one of his correspondents, on this sub- but one can discern beauties in it that one does not see in ject, he said, —“ I beseech you ever to bear in mind what other mouths. Her figure is not large, but easy and wellI seek for in a wife. I am not one of your mad kind of proportioned. She affects a nonchalance in her speech lovers, who dote even upon faults, when once they are and carriage; but there is a grace in her every act, and taken by beauty of person. The only beauty that entices an indescribable charm about her, by which she never fails me is, that she be chaste, obedient, humble, economical, to work her way to the heart. Her mental gifts are patient; and that there be hopes that she will be soli- exquisite ; her conversation is charming; and, if she be citous about my health. If, therefore, you think it capricious more than any other can be, all sits gracefully expedient that I should marry, bestir yourself, lest some- on the beautiful,-one bears anything from the beautiful." body else anticipate you. But, if you think otherwise, She was an excellent actress, and was run after by the let us drop the subject altogetber.” A rich, young town. Moliere, her husband, was neglected by her, and German lady, of noble birth, was proposed; but Calvin suffered agonies of torture. He strove against his passion objected, on the ground of the high birth, Another was as long as he could. At last his patience was exhausted, proposed to him, but another failure resulted. At last a and a separation took place. widow, with a considerable family of children, Odelette We know nothing of the married life of Shakspere; de Bures, the relict of a Strasburg Anabaptist, whom he indeed, we know but little of any portion of that great had converted, was discovered, suited to his notions, and man's life. But we know that he married young, and he married her. Nothing is said about their wedded life, we know the name of his wife, Anne Hathawaye, the and, therefore, we presume it went on in the quiet, jog- daugbter of a yeoman, in the neighbourhood of Stratfordtrot way. At her death he did not shed a tear; and he on-Avon, He was little more than eighteen when he spoke of the event only as an ordinary spectator would married her, and she was twenty-six. The marriage was have done.

hastened by circumstances which need not be explained The brothers, Corneille, married the two sisters, Lam- here. He seems to have gone alone to London, leaving périère ; and the love of the whole family was cemented her with her little family of children at Stratford-on-Avon, by the double union. They lived in contiguous houses, (for her name does not once appear in his married life); which opened into each other, and there they lived in a and yet she survived him seven years : in his will be left community of taste and sentiment. They worked toge- her only his “second-best bed.” Judging from his ther, and shared each other's fame; the sisters happy in Sonnets, one would be disposed to infer that Shakspere's the love and admiration of their husbands, and in each life was not more chaste than that of his age; for we find other's sympathy. The poet, Racine, was greatly blessed him, in one of these, excusing his friend for robbing him in his wife; she was pious, good, sweet-tempered, and of his mist:ess, -a married woman. One could almost made his life happy. And yet she had no taste for poetry, wish, with Mr. Hallam, that Shakspere had not written scarcely knowing what verse was ; and knew little of her many of those Sonnets, beautiful in language and imagery husband's great tragedies except by name. She had an though they unquestionably are. utter indifference for money. One day, Racine brought Milton was three times married, -the first time very from Versailles a purse of a thousand golden louis ; and, unhappily. Mary Powell was the daughter of a royalist running to his wife, embraced her: “Congratulate me,' cavalier of Oxfordshire, and Milton was a zealous repubsaid he," here is a purse of a thousand louis, that the lican: he was moreover a studious man, whereas his wife king has presented to me!" She complained to him of was possessed by a love of gaiety and pleasure. They had one of the children, who would not learn his lessons for only been married a month, when she grew tired of the two days together. “Let us talk of that another time,” studious habits and philosophical seclusion of the repubsaid he, "to-day we give ourselves up to joy.” She lican poet, and requested his permission to return to her again reverted to the disobedient child, and requested father's house. She went, but refused to return to him, the parent to reprimand him; when Boileau (at whose preferring the dissipated society of the brawling cavaliers house she was on a visit) lost patience, and cried, who surrounded her. He beseeched her to come back, “What insensibility! Can't you think of a purse of a but she persistently refused, treating his messengers with thousand louis !" Yet these two characters, though so contumely and contempt. He bore this for a long time; opposite, consorted admirably, and they lived long and but at last he grew angry, and repudiated her. He happily together.

bethought himself of the social mischiefs resulting from ill. To please his friends, La Fontaine married Mary assorted marriages, like his own; and, full of the subject, Hericat, the daughter of a lieutenant-general. It was a he composed and published his celebrated treatise on marriage of convenience, and the two preferred living sepa- “ Divorce.” On public grounds, he pleaded his own cause rate,--he at Paris, she in the country. Once a year, La in this work, which contains, perhaps, the finest passages Fontaine paid her a visit, in the month of September. that are to be found in his prose writings. He proceeded If he did not see her, he returned home as happy as he to solicit the hand of another young and beautiful lady, had gone. He went some other day. Once, when he the daughter of Dr. Dawes; but his wife, hearing of this, visited her house, he was told she was quite well, and he became repentant, and, returning to him, fell upon ber returned to Paris, and told his friends he had not seen his knees, and entreated bis forgiveness. Milton, like his own wife, because he understood she was in very good health. It Adam, was “ fondly overcome with female charms," and was a state of indifference on both sides. Yet the wife consented. Four children were born to them, but the was a woman of virtue, beauty, and intelligence; and La wife died in childbed of the fifth infant. It is to Milton's Fontaine himself was a man of otherwise irreproachable honour, that he behaved to his deceased wife's relatives character. There were many such marriages of indiffe- with great generosity, when, a short time after, they berence in France in those days. Boileau and Racine both came involved in ruin in the progress of the civil wars. tried to bring the married pair together, but without His second wife, Catherine Woodcock, also died in child. success; and, ia course of time, La Fontaine almost forgot bed, only a year after marriage. He seems to have loved that he was married.

her fondly; and most readers will remember his beautiful Moliere was extremely unhappy in his marriage. He sonnet, consecrated to her memory :

« 上一頁繼續 »