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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Friday, July 8, 1861. (General HANCOCK:

DEAR GENERAL: An article in the New York Tribune of the 27th ultimo was so unjust to you in one of its charges that I intended to have expressed to you my regret long since, but finally deemed it best to wait for the return of the correspondent (Mr. Kent), who, from what I know of him, would be most anxious to repair any error into which he had been led by mistake. He has been ordered not to come back, and so, unable to have justice done in that manner, I have only to express my regrets that he should have been so misinformed about your having refused to co-operate in any attack. No one who knows you, general, would ever bring a charge of that kind against you, and that the charge should have been made in an article intended to do justice to the Eighteenth Corps is to me, as I have before stated, a matter of great regret. Yours, very truly,

WM. F. SMITH.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864. Colonel BURTON:

Colonel Abbot informs me that he has been called upon for six more 8-inch mortars for your front. Let me know as soon as possible the necessity for this that I may give the orders for them.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. Brigadier-General HUNT,

Chief of Artillery, Headquarters Army of the Potomac: The mortars are required to enable us to silence a new battery of the enemy in front of General Turner's center that cannot be reached by horizontal fire or by the Coehorns. The 8-inch mortars now in position must remain so.

H. S. BURTON,

Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864–8,10 a, in. Colonel BURTON: I have ordered up the mortars and ammunition on your statement.

HENRY J. HUNT,

Brigadier General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864-12 p. m. General STANNARD:

GENERAL: General Smith desires you to have a staff officer in your lines during the night to see that one-half of your troops are kept

awake and ready for any emergency. He also desires me to again make mention of the order regarding your reserve brigade in case of any attack upon your front. Very respectfully, &c.,

WM. RUSSELL, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

July 8, 1864. Capt. A. S. KIMBALL,

Assistant Quartermaster, Fort Monroe, &c. : General Grant desires that no more ocean steamers be sent to New Orleans.

RUFUS INGALLS, Brigadier-General and Chief Quartermaster.

JULY 8, 1864–9.30 a. m.

(Received 10.10 a. m.) Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.: Your dispatch of the 7th has just been received. I saw yester. day Captains Hines and Gregory, commanding the two gun-boats stationed at this place, and made arrangements with them for additional force should it be necessary. I telegraphed yesterday that General Hinks had started for Washington at 4 p. m. The utmost vigilance shall be exercised here. The telegraph operator states that his line was out of order last night,

JAMES BARNES, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT, OF WASHINGTON, 220 ARMY CORPS,

Washington, D. C., July 8, 1864. General BARNES,

Commanding, Point Lookout: General Butler telegraphs that a rebel deserter reports that Early intends, among other things, to attack Point Lookout and release the prisoners there. Be on your guard, therefore. Notify the gun-boats and keep some of your cavalry well out.

C. C. AUGUR,

Major-General.

POINT LOOKOUT, July 8, 1864.

(Received 1.50 p. m.) General C. C. AUGUR,

Commanding : Your dispatch is received and will be attended to. I had two extra gun-boats on duty last night; placed additional pickets in front. All

the command ready at a moment's notice all night and will be kept so. Had further interview with the officers in charge of gun-boats to-day. Two hundred and fifty prisoners leave in about an hour for New York.

JAMES BARNES,

Brigadier-General.

POINT LOOKOUT, July 8, 1861.

(Received Washington 7 p. m.) Maj. C. H. RAYMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General: All quiet here. Two hundred and fifty prisoners of war left here this p. m. for New York by Colonel Hoffman's order; extra precaution taken.

JAMES BARNES, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

No. 74.

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HDQRs. DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., July 8, 1864.

VI. Col. Thomas J.C. Amory, commanding Sub-District of Beaufort, will send four companies of the Ninth Vermont Volunteers under command of either the lieutenant-colonel or major, to report for duty to Brigadier-General Harland, commanding Sub-District of New Berne. All camp and garrison equipage will be taken. The quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.

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By command of Brig. Gen. I, N. Palmer:

J. A. JUDSON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 9, 1861–12 m.

(Received 7.45 p. m.) Hon. EDWIN M, STANTON,

Secretary of War: Gêneral Grant has already recommended for promotion Colonel McIntosh and Colonel Chapman of the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac, but he desires me again to ask your attention to the matter. They have long commanded brigades and their regiments soon go out of service. They are officers of great value, and if refused cannot well be replaced.

C. A. DANA,

WASHINGTON, July 9, 186-1-1 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.. If General Canby's troops arrive in time, I respectfully suggest that they be sent here without disembarking at Fort Monroe. Only one division of Hunter's army has passed Cumberland. His advance is at

Cherry Run. Low water in the Ohio River is given as the cause of delay. Rodes' division is said to be with Breckinridge. No important change reported since my telegram of last evening.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

City Point, VA., July 9, 1864.

(Received 7.30 p. im.) Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.: If you think it necessary, order the Nineteenth Corps as it arrives at Fortress Monroe to Washington. About the 18th or 20th is the time I should like to have a large force here; but if the rebel force now north can be captured or destroyed I would willingly postpone aggressive operations to destroy them, and could send in addition to the Nineteenth Corps, the balance of the Sixth Corps.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 9, 1864–5.30 p. m.

(Received 1.30 p. m. 10th.) Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, I), C.: I have ordered the remainder of the Sixth Corps to Washington. On account of scarcity of transportation I do not send wagons or artillery, but they will follow if you say it is wanted. I think most of the 3,000 cavalry sent are fit for duty. They certainly must have reached Baltimore with the other troops. If the Nineteenth Corps reaches Fortress Monroe in time you can take it also if you deem it advisable.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 9, 1864-6 p. m.

(Received 1.05 p. m. 10th.) Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.: Forces enough to defeat all that Early has with him should get in his rear south of him, and follow him up sharply, leaving him to go north, defending depots, towns, &c., with small garrisons and the militia. If the President thinks it advisable that I should go to Washington in person I can start in an hour after receiving notice, leaving everything here on the defensive.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 9, 1864—7 p.m.

(Received 1.20 p. m. 10th.) Major-General HALLECK,

Washington, D. C.: After the dismounted cavalry had left here I learned accidentally that it was composed of detachments from all regiments. My order was worded to send the dismounted cavalry, but I never intended that

detachments should be sent, but that organized regiments should go. If I had thought of the matter I would have ordered so many regi. ments to be dismounted and their horses turned over to the detachments, and sent them back to their regiments.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General,

WASHINGTON, D, C., July 9, 1864-9 p. m.

(Received 11.20 a. m. 10th.) Lieut. Gen. U.S. GRANT,

City Point, Va.: A dispatch not signed by Lew. Wallace, but approved by him, to the newspaper press states that they had a severe battle to-day near Monocacy bridge, and that our troops were defeated and are now retreating on the Baltimore road. Knowing the character of the source, you can judge of its reliability. Nothing further from Hunter. I do not deem it safe to withdraw any forces from Harper's Ferry till he forms a junction. Please inform me what forces besides Ricketts' division have been sent to Baltimore in order that I may know the means of defense to arrive at that place.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

WASHINGTON, July 9, 1864--11 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT,

City Point, Va.. As the arrival of the Nineteenth Corps is very uncertain, I think the remainder of the Sixth Corps should be sent to this place. I have ordered all troops from the North to be stopped at Baltimore for the defense of that city,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff

SPECIAL ORDERS, | HDQRS. ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,
No. 52.

City Point, Va., July 9, 1861. 1. First Lient. C. B. Phillips, Engineer Corps, will report in person to Maj. Gen. W. F. Smith, commanding Eighteenth Army Corps, for duty.

II. Maj. Gen. E. O. C. Ord will proceed without delay to Washington, D, C., and report to Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck for orders.

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By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

E. S. PARKER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 9, 1864—10 a. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I have nothing of importance to report as occurring along the lines during the past twenty-four bours. About 5 p. m. yesterday the

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