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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864--5.50 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Burnside and Warren report the enemy opening their batteries on them, also on Smith's front. Some little musketry with Burnside. The object not known.

GEO. G. MEADE, Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864—6 p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Two battalions of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery accompanied Ricketts' division. The remaining battalion will at once be ordered to Washington. This regiment is probably as familiar with artillery as any we have.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, July 8, 1864. General MEADE:

Several days since the lieutenant-general commanding telegraphed to Washington to have sent here for the Ninth Army Corps two batteries, by name particularly designated, neither of which has arrived so far as any information has been received here. You will therefore assign the Third Maine Battery to the Ninth Army Corps, in lieu of those telegraphed for. By command of Lieutenant-General Grant:

JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff

SPECIAL ORDERS,

No. 231.

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, July 8, 1861.

60. The telegraphic dispatch of July 5, 1864, to Lieutenant-General Grant, relieving Brig. Gen. J. G. Barnard from duty at his headquarters, and directing him to report to the chief of the Corps of Engineers in this city, is hereby moditied. Brigadier-General Barnard will report to Major-General Halleck, chief of staff, in this city. By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., July 8, 1861. General R. E. LEE,

Commanding Confederate Forces, near Petersburg, Va.. I would request that Col. James F. Jaquess, Seventy-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and J. R. Gilmore, esq., be allowed to meet Col. Robert Ould,.commissioner for the exchange of prisoners, at such place

between the lines of the two armies as you may designate. The object of the meeting is legitimate with Colonel Ould as commissioner. If not consistent for you to grant the request here asked, I would beg that this be referred to President Davis for his action.

Requesting as early an answer to this communication as you may find it convenient to make, I subscribe myself, &c.,

U. S, GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

July 8, 1864. Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff : GENERAL: A servant belonging to Colonel McIntosh, commanding cavalry brigade, was captured on General Wilson's late raid near Stony Creek Depot, and made his escape from the rebel lines a week ago last Thursday. He states that he was taken under guard to Stony Creek Depot and put in with a number of other prisoners, where he remained nearly a day; that while there he was taken before a general officer and examined. He was asked a number of questions relative to the strength and movements of our army, particularly about the strength and organization of Wilson's cavalry. He was told by the soldiers that it was General Ewell. He describes him as being a tall, spare-built man, with heavy mustache and no beard; thinks he had a false leg, as one foot appeared larger than the other. There was a considerable force of cavalry at Stony Creek Depot, and a regiment of infantry, also a large number of wagons. He saw three or four locomotives and trains of cars, some of them loaded with bacon. There is a large warehouse there on the south side of the creek near the railroad, which was filled with grain. Two cannon were placed in it guarding the road crossing, embrasures having been cut through the building, and also loop-holes for musketry. They were fortifying the south side of the creek very strongly, and had extensive rifle-pits all along the bank of the stream. On this side of the creek also were rifle-pits, but not very extensive. Informant is not acquainted with any of the rebel generals except Fitzhugh Lee. He says he saw him there. He is confident that General Ewell was there, but has no means of knowing that it was he other than what the soldiers said. An ignorant negro from James Ennis' farm, vear the Weldon railroad, about five miles from Petersburg, came in last night. He says he has been cutting wheat and taking

it into Petersburg during the last week. He went into the city last Friday and returned to Mr. Ennis' place Wednesday. Ennis lives in Petersburg and is storing his wheat there. He says they are repairing the Weldon railroad, and trains run out and back morning and night, with the workmen. He understands there is a considerable force of cavalry and infantry at Colonel Wyatt's place, some three miles below Ennis'. He met small parties of soldiers on his road to Petersburg going backward and forward. He went in on the Halifax road, which runs along the railroad, which is regularly patrolled. He is unintelligent, and can give no definite information of what he saw in Petersburg. A deserter from the First Confederate Battalion, of Davis' brigade, Heth's division, came into our lines about 6 o'clock this morning. He was forwarded from the Third Division of the Second Corps. He is an

Englishman by birth, and is thoroughly disgusted with the Southern army. Having been with them but two months, he can give no important information. It is understood in camp that General Grant had issued an order that all women and children should leave Petersburg; that the town was nearly deserted. A shell exploded the gas works a few days since, and made a complete wreck of the establishment and surrounding buildings. No one was injured. He reports his brigade about 1,200 for duty. Their division occupies the extreme right of the line, with Kirkland's brigade in reserve. He can give no information of General Early's force. Very respectfully,

JOHN C. BABCOCK.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1861. Maj. Gen. A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff: GENERAL: I would respectfully report a new work of small size about 100 yards in rear of Gregory's house. The rifle-pit reported yesterday begins at the above work and extends about eighty rods to our left, and several hundred yards in rear of enemy's front line. They are still extending it. A locomotive, tender, and six platform-cars passed southward this morning, upon the Weldon railroad, loaded with materials, as of timber, ties, or rails. There were also many men on the train. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER, Captain and Chief Signal Officer.

PLANK ROAD STATION, July 8, 1861–7 p. m. Capt. B. F. FISHER:

At 4.30 p. m. a small detachment of infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and a battery of five pieces passed to our left on road near Weldon railroad. At same time sharp artillery practice began on both sides. The enemy opened from two batteries, one immediately in front of station, the other east of plank road near Gregory's house.

J. B. DUFF, Lieutenant and Signal Officer.

JULY 8, 1864–5 p. m. Capt. B. F. FISHER,

Chief Signal Officer, Headquarters Army of the Potomac : Rebel signal station at Archer's still reports to Colonel Brent, assistant adjutant-general, but nothing worthy of report intercepted' to-day. No observations to-night.

F. FULLER, Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

July 8, 1861–9 h. m. Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac: I have nothing new to report with regard to my line or the enemy.

WINFD S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864, Brig. Gen, S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac: GENERAL: I have no change to report in the disposition of my troops or lines, except that the construction of abatis and slashing of timber in my front is nearly completed.

WINFD S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, SECOND ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. Lieut. Col. F. A. WALKER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Army Corps : COLONEL: I have the honor to report no changes in my line during the day; no movements of the enemy have been observed. I have slashed a belt of timber about thirty yards in breadth in the edge of the woods along the entire front of my line, in addition to what had been previously slashed, which was considerable.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS C. BARLOW, Brigadier General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1861–9 a. m. General WILLIAMS:

All quiet during the night, and the work we are engaged upon is going on without any interruption.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864–5.30 p. m. General MEADE:

There seems to be cannonading on the enemy's line from my left clear along down to the river, also some musketry on General Burnside's front.

• G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864. General WILLIAMS: All quiet along my line.

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1861. Brigadier-General GRIFFIN,

Commanding First Division : GENERAL: The major-general commanding desires that you move up General Bartlett's brigade, so as to connect by General Ayres' left. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRED. T LOCKE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH CORPS,

July 8, 1864. General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General: Morning report to-day: The engineer battalion were ordered to report this morning to Colonel Spaulding, by directions received from Major Duane, to prepare siege material.

II. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1864. (Sent 12.45 p. m.) Major-General WRIGHT,

Commanding Sirth Corps : The commanding general directs me to inquire whether Colonel Bryan's cavalry detachment has been relieved by one of the regularly organized brigades of cavalry.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

July 8, 1864-1 p. m. Major-General HUMPHREYS:

Colonel Bryan was on duty and made his reports this morning. I have heard nothing of his being relieved. The detachment of his command under Captain Crowninshield was relieved some days ago by the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General.

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