The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet

封面
Penguin Canada, 2015年3月17日 - 304 頁
SHORTLISTED FOR CANADA READS 2017

The Right to Be Cold is a human story of resilience, commitment, and survival told from the unique vantage point of an Inuk woman who, in spite of many obstacles, rose from humble beginnings in the Arctic community of Kuujjuaq, Quebec—where she was raised by a single parent and grandmother and travelled by dog team in a traditional, ice-based Inuit hunting culture—to become one of the most influential and decorated environmental, cultural, and human rights advocates in the world.

 

The Right to Be Cold explores the parallels between safeguarding the Arctic and the survival of Inuit culture—and ultimately the world—in the face of past, present, and future environmental degradation. Sheila Watt-Cloutier passionately argues that climate change is a human rights issue and one to which all of us on the planet are inextricably linked. The Right to Be Cold is the culmination of Watt-Cloutier’s regional, national, and international work over the last twenty-five years, weaving historical traumas and current issues such as climate change, leadership, and sustainability in the Arctic into her personal story to give a coherent and holistic voice to an important subject.

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

LibraryThing Review

用戶評語  - LibraryCin - LibraryThing

3.5 stars Sheila Watt-Cloutier was born in a Northern Quebec Inuit community and raised by her mother and her grandmother. She was sent away to school in Churchill, and (mostly) enjoyed her time there ... 閱讀評論全文

The Right To Be Cold: One Woman's Fight To Protect the Arctic and Save the Planet from Climate Change

用戶評語  - Book Verdict

Multi-award-winning activist Watt-Cloutier, who was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for her work on climate change and its impact on human rights, pens a fascinating memoir of her life as ... 閱讀評論全文

其他版本 - 查看全部

關於作者 (2015)

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of the world’s most recognized environmental and human rights advocates. In 2007, she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy work in showing the impact global climate change has on human rights, especially in the Arctic. In addition to her Nobel nomination, Watt-Cloutier has been awarded the Aboriginal Achievement Award, the UN Champion of the Earth Award, and the prestigious Norwegian Sophie Prize. She is also an officer of the Order of Canada. From 1995 to 2002, she served as the elected Canadian president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), and in 2002, she was elected international chair of the council. Under her leadership, the world’s first international legal action on climate change was launched with a petition to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

書目資訊