The North Korean Revolution, 1945–1950

封面
Cornell University Press, 2004年2月19日 - 265 頁

North Korea, despite a shattered economy and a populace suffering from widespread hunger, has outlived repeated forecasts of its imminent demise. Charles K. Armstrong contends that a major source of North Korea's strength and resiliency, as well as of its flaws and shortcomings, lies in the poorly understood origins of its system of government. He examines the genesis of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) both as an important yet rarely studied example of a communist state and as part of modern Korean history.

North Korea is one of the last redoubts of "unreformed" Marxism-Leninism in the world. Yet it is not a Soviet satellite in the East European manner, nor is its government the result of a local revolution, as in Cuba and Vietnam. Instead, the DPRK represents a unique "indigenization" of Soviet Stalinism, Armstrong finds. The system that formed under the umbrella of the Soviet occupation quickly developed into a nationalist regime as programs initiated from above merged with distinctive local conditions. Armstrong's account is based on long-classified documents captured by U.S. forces during the Korean War. This enormous archive of over 1.6 million pages provides unprecedented insight into the making of the Pyongyang regime and fuels the author's argument that the North Korean state is likely to remain viable for some years to come.

 

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內容

Revolution on the Margins
13
Liberation Occupation and the Emerging New Order
38
Remaking the People
71
Coalition Politics and the United Front
107
Planning the Economy
136
Constructing Culture
166
A Regime of Surveillance
191
The Peoples State
215
Conclusion
240
A Note on Sources
247
Statements of General Chistiakov on the Soviet Occupation of North Korea Fall 1945
251
Selected Bibliography
255
Index
263
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熱門章節

第 6 頁 - Scalapino and Chong-sik Lee, Communism in Korea, Berkeley. University of California Press, 1972; Barry Gills, 'North Korea and the Crisis of Socialism: The Historical Ironies of National Division'.
第 10 頁 - The First Congress of the Toilers of the Far East held in Moscow January 21-February 1, 1922: Closing Session in Petrograd, February 2, 1922 (Petrograd: The Communist International, 1922), passim. 8. VI Lenin, "Preliminary Thesis on the National-Colonial Question,

關於作者 (2004)

Charles K. Armstrong is the Korea Foundation Associate Professor of Korean Studies at Columbia University. He is the editor of Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy, and the State and coeditor of Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia.