Diary of a Madman and Other Stories

封面
University of Hawaii Press, 1990 - 389 頁
Xun (or Hsun) is the master (inventor?) of the modern Chinese short story. Some of his stories were translated into American English in 1941, but more recent translations have been into a British English. Lyell provides an introduction, notes on pronunciation and further notes on the text, intending to win as wide an audience as possible beyond those already familiar with Chinese history and culture. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

讀者評等

5 顆星
2
4 顆星
1
3 顆星
2
2 顆星
0
1 星級
0

LibraryThing Review

用戶評語  - Olivermagnus - LibraryThing

The story begins with the narrator's visit to a pair of brothers who were close friends of his during his school years. The older brother informs him that the younger one suffered from a mental ... 閱讀評論全文

LibraryThing Review

用戶評語  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

Very short story. Man studies Confucian classics, thinks people are going to eat him. There's a bit of a political metaphor. E! (Save the children!) 閱讀評論全文

已選取的頁面

內容

Preface
vii
A Note on Pronunciation
xliii
Remembrances of the Past 1911
3
Diary of a Madman
29
Kong Yiji
43
Medicine
49
Tomorrow
59
An Unimportant Affair
67
A Comedy of Ducks
197
New Years Sacrifice
219
Upstairs in a Wineshop
242
A Happy Family
255
Soap
264
The Eternal Lamp
279
A Warning to the People
291
The Venerable Schoolmaster Gao
297

A Passing Storm
77
Hometown
89
Ah QThe Real Story
101
Dragonboat Festival
173
The White Light
184
Some Rabbits and a Cat
191
The Loner
311
Mourning the Dead
338
Brothers
363
Divorce
377
版權所有

常見字詞

關於作者 (1990)

A writer, essayist, translator, poet, and literary theorist and critic, Lu Hsun was born in the Chekiang Province of an educated family whose fortunes were in decline. He went to Japan to study Western medicine, but he dropped out of Sendai Medical College in 1906 after seeing news slides of Japanese soldiers decapitating Chinese in Manchuria. He made a decision to cure the "souls" of his countrymen rather than their bodies and chose literature as his medium. Lu Hsun returned to China in 1909 and watched the progress of the 1911 revolution with dismay. His spirits were raised somewhat in 1917 when the magazine New Youth raised the banner of literary revolution. He joined the ranks of the new writers with his short story "Diary of a Madman." Several more stories soon followed, the most famous of which was "The True Story of Ah Q" in the early 1920's. In 1926, after one of many periodic bouts of depression, Lu Hsun traveled for a while in the south and then settled in Shanghai, where he was greeted as a doyen on the literary scene. However, although many young writers wanted to become his disciples, he had an ambivalent attitude toward them and often became bitter or angry when he disagreed with their theories. The League of Left-Wing Writers was founded in 1930 and promptly took him as their leader. But from the beginning, relations were quite strained, and, by the time he died in 1936, he was completely alienated from these men who would later sing his praises. The extent of Lu Hsun's work and his high standards laid the foundation for modern Chinese literature, and he is still considered to be China's greatest twentieth-century writer in the People's Republic. His stories are satiric, unflinchingly realistic, disturbing, and brilliantly crafted in tone and style. In addition to this rich legacy, he also translated a number of European works of literature and theoretical studies on art and literature into Chinese, and he helped to introduce modern art to China.

書目資訊