State and Court Ritual in China

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Joseph P. McDermott
Cambridge University Press, 1999年9月16日 - 446 頁
1 評論
This broad-ranging examination of Chinese court and state ritual from 1000 BC to AD 1750 represents the first modern comprehensive account of the subject in any language. The essays demonstrate how and why ritual has played such a fundamental and often controversial role in the practice of Chinese politics. By tracing the political and social development of particular rituals, such as imperial funerals and popular religious practices or Buddhist ordination ceremonies and court audiences, the authors set out to convey their historical significance. Further discussion of the role of ritual in relation to language, and elite and popular concepts of emperorhood is included in the volume. The book will be of interest to students of Chinese history, anthropology and religion, as well as those seeking to understand the legacy of that history in modern China.
  

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Ancient Chinese ritual as seen in the material record
20
Theeng and shan sacrifices of Emperor Wu of the
50
The imperial way of death in Han China MICHAEL LOEWE
81
the bodhisattva ordination
112
The death rites of Tang Daizong DAVID L MCMULLEN
150
The ceremony of gratitude OLIVER MOORE
197
The imperial household cults ROBERT L CHARD
237
representing the state in South China
267
the community pact
299
Manchu shamanic ceremonies at the Qing court
352
reflections on ritual in imperial
399
Glossary
417
Index
437
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關於作者 (1999)

Dr Joseph P. McDermott is Reader in Chinese History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John's College. He has published widely on the pre-modern social and economic history of China.

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