Colonial Modernity in Korea

封面
Michael Edson Robinson, Gi-Wook Shin
Harvard Univ Asia Center, 2001年8月1日 - 466 頁
1 評論

The twelve chapters in this volume seek to overcome the nationalist paradigm of Japanese repression and exploitation versus Korean resistance that has dominated the study of Korea's colonial period (1910-1945) by adopting a more inclusive, pluralistic approach that stresses the complex relations among colonialism, modernity, and nationalism. By addressing such diverse subjects as the colonial legal system, radio, telecommunications, the rural economy, and industrialization and the formation of industrial labor, one group of essays analyzes how various aspects of modernity emerged in the colonial context and how they were mobilized by the Japanese for colonial domination, with often unexpected results. A second group examines the development of various forms of identity from nation to gender to class, particularly how aspects of colonial modernity facilitated their formation through negotiation, contestation, and redefinition.

  

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內容

Rethinking Colonial Korea
1
Modernity Legality and Power in Korea
21
Broadcasting Cultural Hegemony and Colonial
52
The Rural Revitalization
70
Internationalism
97
Colonial Industrial Growth and the Emergence
128
Colonial Korea in Japans Imperial
161
Women and
191
The Making of
221
Yi Kwangsus The Heartless
248
National Identity and the Creation of the Category
288
The Paekchong Movement
311
Exorcising Hegels Ghosts Toward
363
Notes
381
Index
455
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關於作者 (2001)

Gi-Wook Shin is the director of Shorenstein APARC; the founding director of the Korean Studies Program; senior fellow at FSI; and associate professor of sociology at Stanford University.

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